Catholicism – Catholic Record Society http://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 11:16:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Catholicism – Catholic Record Society http://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/ 32 32 Religious leaders need to make it clear that faith is not a reason not to get immunized https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/religious-leaders-need-to-make-it-clear-that-faith-is-not-a-reason-not-to-get-immunized/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/religious-leaders-need-to-make-it-clear-that-faith-is-not-a-reason-not-to-get-immunized/#respond Sat, 28 Aug 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/religious-leaders-need-to-make-it-clear-that-faith-is-not-a-reason-not-to-get-immunized/ As more governments, businesses and schools mandate vaccinations, it’s common to see them say they will grant exemptions from getting a COVID-19 vaccine to those who cannot. do so for medical reasons or based on religious beliefs. Religious belief? I’m confused. I cannot think of a single religion that prohibits receiving a life-saving vaccine. Of […]]]>



As more governments, businesses and schools mandate vaccinations, it’s common to see them say they will grant exemptions from getting a COVID-19 vaccine to those who cannot. do so for medical reasons or based on religious beliefs.

Religious belief? I’m confused. I cannot think of a single religion that prohibits receiving a life-saving vaccine.

Of course, some religions are concerned about how vaccines are made. Jews and Muslims oppose all vaccines made with pork products, and Hindus are concerned about the use of bovine material. Roman Catholics have moral reservations about vaccines made using aborted fetuses.

But all three groups told their supporters the COVID-19 vaccine was acceptable – Jews and Muslims because it did not contain pork products, and Hindus because nothing bovine was used. .

For Roman Catholics, the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops has told its members that all COVID-19 vaccines that are medically approved by the relevant health authorities “may be lawfully received by Catholics.” This even includes all vaccines made using fetal cells, if there is no other choice.

Of course, there are a few small Christian denominations that oppose vaccines, such as some conservative Reform Christian groups who believe vaccinations interfere with divine providence, and Christian Science, which believes disease can be cured through prayer. . But even members of the Christian Science faith are not urged to avoid mandatory vaccinations.

So why are we still talking about religious exemptions to the COVID-19 vaccine if there is no basis for granting one? Perhaps this is because we want to be very careful not to offend, or because governments, businesses, and other groups in Canada today don’t know what religious groups actually teach.

If they did a little research, they would find that requests for exemptions based on religious grounds actually have more to do with other factors that are not based on religion at all.

This is what John Grabenstein wrote in the diary Vaccine in an article titled “What the World’s Religions Teach Applies to Vaccines.”

“In many cases, ostensibly religious reasons for refusing vaccination actually reflected concerns about vaccine safety or the personal beliefs of a social network of people organized around a religious community, rather than theological objections per se. “, did he declare.

A similar conclusion was drawn by Paul Bramadat, Director of the Center for Studies in Religion and Society at the University of Victoria, Benjamin L. Berger, Professor and York University Research Chair in Pluralism and Public Law at the University of Victoria. Osgoode Hall Law School, and Noni MacDonald. , professor of pediatrics and Dalhousie University and IWK Health Center in Halifax.

Write in the Globe and Mail earlier this year, they noted that religious objections to vaccination are a combination of spiritual and social forces in the minds of individuals and communities.

As an example, they note how some religious people can create a belief system that incorporates traditional theological understandings with things like veganism, reiki, homeopathy, yoga, or traditional folk medicines that can then be incorporated. in vaccine hesitation.

They don’t mention politics, but I would add that as well; some who vote in certain ways tend to be less open to vaccination, which is especially true in the United States, but also for a few people in Canada. And some religious groups have a long-standing mistrust of science that may cause them to avoid getting the vaccine.

“It might be better to think of the reluctance to vaccinate as a rhizome, with tangled root systems, extensive nodes and aerial shoots that often change in appearance,” they write, adding “If we wish to eradicate or even just pruning this complex organism, we should expect it to be different at different times and places. ”

Perhaps it is time for religious leaders to clarify that faith is not a reason not to get vaccinated, as happened in the United States this month in the Mennonite Brethren denomination of this country.

When some members of this group asked for a statement supporting their request for religious exemption, the denomination publicly declined. In a statement, he said that neither his current or historical practice, nor his theological beliefs nor his confession of faith justifies granting a religious exemption from the COVID-19 vaccine.

Maybe if more faith groups did this, it would do at least three things.

First, it might persuade a few more people to get the vaccine.

Second, it would help governments, businesses or other groups understand that religion is not an acceptable reason to oppose vaccinations.

Do you appreciate the extensive religious coverage by the free press? Become a supporter of the Religion in the News project! Your contribution of $ 10, $ 25 or more can help us continue to provide reliable faith coverage in Manitoba.Become a supporter
Click here to learn more about the project.

Third, it could help reduce the derision and contempt that some non-religious people heap on religion because of the way some use it to oppose vaccines – for how faith, in general, is slandered. by the selfish actions of the few who use it. to avoid being responsible for the health of their neighbors.

Perhaps the last word should go to Pope Francis, who appeared in a public service advertisement this month to promote vaccination against COVID-19.

In the ad, he urges people to get vaccinated against the virus, claiming that vaccinations are a moral responsibility and emblematic of a fundamental part of Catholicism: the common good.

“Getting the vaccines authorized by the respective authorities is an act of love,” he said. “And helping the majority of people to do it is an act of love.”

And to that, all believers can say “Amen.”

faith@freepress.mb.ca

John longhurst
faith reporter

John Longhurst has written for the Winnipeg religious pages since 2003. He also writes for the Religion News Service in the United States and blogs on media, marketing and communications at Making the News.

Read the full biography

]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/religious-leaders-need-to-make-it-clear-that-faith-is-not-a-reason-not-to-get-immunized/feed/ 0
Partition 100 years later: Denis Henry, the Catholic trade unionist who was the first Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/partition-100-years-later-denis-henry-the-catholic-trade-unionist-who-was-the-first-lord-chief-justice-of-northern-ireland/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/partition-100-years-later-denis-henry-the-catholic-trade-unionist-who-was-the-first-lord-chief-justice-of-northern-ireland/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 00:17:23 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/partition-100-years-later-denis-henry-the-catholic-trade-unionist-who-was-the-first-lord-chief-justice-of-northern-ireland/ ON August 15, 1921, in a low-key ceremony in the unlikely setting of Portrush Town Hall, Sir Denis Stanislaus Henry was sworn in as the first Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland. Under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, the judiciary in Ireland was divided into two judicial bodies, the north and the south. Henry’s […]]]>

ON August 15, 1921, in a low-key ceremony in the unlikely setting of Portrush Town Hall, Sir Denis Stanislaus Henry was sworn in as the first Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland.

Under the Government of Ireland Act 1920, the judiciary in Ireland was divided into two judicial bodies, the north and the south. Henry’s appointment was approved by the Northern Government in early August, along with that of Northern Ireland’s first Attorney General, Richard Best.

Until then, with the transfer of services delayed and the UK government in talks with Sinn Féin, the Northern Ireland project seemed a bit stillborn.

The Irish News mockingly said the Northern Parliament was “inherently impractical … Appointments have been made with big salaries; and we now learn that the absurd northern justice system has been sent back with the nonexistent elevation to the bench of Mr. Denis Henry, KC, as Lord Chief Justice … The government of Sir James Craig cannot undertake any work with any degree of permanence, for there can be no permanence in this score “.

Very little emphasis was placed on Henry’s Catholicism by the press. Northern Ireland’s Prime Minister James Craig said years later: “I have never yet known a prosperous country where judicial appointments have been made for religious reasons. . “

When in 1930, five years after Henry’s death, after an accusation was laid that no Catholic had been brought up to the bench, Craig replied that “since the death of our old friend Denis Henry” he had “not been possible to find a fully qualified Catholic lawyer to serve as a judge,” clearly inferring that Catholics could aspire to judicial appointments if they met the requirements.

Despite Craig’s claims to the contrary, the history of Northern Ireland’s judicial system suggests that appointments to its ranks were once barely achievable for aspiring Catholics.

After Henry’s death in 1925, no other Catholic was appointed to the highest court until 1949. Until 1969, Catholics held only six of 68 senior judicial positions.

While Henry was a Catholic, he was not a nationalist, occupying a truly unique position being a Catholic Unionist MP for Ulster before being appointed Lord Chief Justice.

While it was not uncommon for Catholics to be Unionist in their political outlook in southern and western Ireland, it was considerably less so in Ulster.

Born in Derry in 1864 to a strongly conservative and pro-Union family, he built his reputation as a lawyer on the North West Circuit of Ireland, an area stretching from Westmeath to Derry, Tyrone and Donegal. He was known as the father of the Northwest Circuit.

He became a Member of Parliament for Derry South with a by-election victory in May 1916. Once elected, he was quickly promoted to Irish legal officers; Solicitor General in 1918 and Attorney General in 1919.

As Attorney General he served during a period of great upheaval in Irish politics and society during the Anglo-Irish War of Independence. He was responsible for the introduction of the Restoration of Order in Ireland Act, which became law in August 1920, which established military courts martial with the power to impose the death penalty.

His introduction of emergency legislation and his staunch opposition to compromise with those he saw as mere rebels and criminals placed him at the top of the list to lead the justice system in the North, where similar circumstances were likely to arise. prevail.

Upon Henry’s appointment, he faced the unenviable task of ensuring that judicial appointments as well as a functioning judicial system were in place a few weeks later, on October 1, when the judicial system of Northern Ireland was to be inaugurated.

The Supreme Court in its original foundation consisted of five judges. Henry was also to oversee the appointment of officials and secure a building as a courthouse by October 1.

Much of the burden of building a court system from scratch fell on Henry who engaged in constant work, setting up the courts and their administration, involving him in discussions and negotiations without end with the governments of Belfast and London, with the Bar and Law Society, representatives of the Council, its counterparts in Dublin and many others. Added to his judicial work, it was a formidable workload.

On October 1, it was not possible to acquire a site and erect a suitable building for the new court. The government bought the site of the old potato market, and it was here on Chichester Street in Belfast that the new courthouse opened in 1933.

During the 12 years preceding the construction of the permanent courthouse, it was necessary to use temporary accommodation. The County Antrim Courthouse on Crumlin Road in Belfast was chosen by Henry as the best option available at the time.

The courthouse was not suitable for housing a permanent staff responsible for carrying out the departmental work of a permanent High Court. The working conditions of the staff were very cramped. The temporary courthouse lacked a waiting room for jurors and contained no separate accommodation for female jurors. There were also no press facilities available.

Henry had numerous meetings and discussions with Treasury officials in Dublin from September to November 1921. Members of the Judicial Officers branch of the four Dublin Courts could be transferred to the Northern Courts, with five eventually arriving from Dublin.

A total of 64 officials were appointed to the court registry, from clerk to messenger. Henry conducted many interviews personally and organized the desks, furniture, dies, seals, presses, and forms for the new bench.

The new court system for Northern Ireland came into effect on October 1 and was officially opened three weeks later on October 24. It was another day of ceremony, recalling the opening of the Northern Parliament four months earlier, another day to demonstrate the viability of Northern jurisdiction.

The judges, dressed in large robes and flared wigs, listened to Lord Chief Justice Henry say: “We will do our best to carry on the traditions handed down to us by the great judges who adorned the Irish bench”.

The judges in situ during the birth of Northern Ireland had an extremely difficult task, given the conditions at the time and the uncertainty surrounding the nascent jurisdiction. Henry has been involved in some very controversial cases as Lord Chief Justice.

In July 1922 he spoke out against the plaintiff in a landmark case (O’Hanlon v Belfast Prison Governor) challenging the legality of the Unionist Government Special Powers Act.

In the case of special agents killing three Catholics in June 1922, Henry admitted that security forces had come under fire. He dismissed the claims for compensation and concluded that the deaths were due to unlawful assembly. As Lord Chief Justice of Northern Ireland, Henry continued to support law enforcement.

The tremendous efforts of Henry to set up the Northern Ireland judicial system and the stress of these turbulent times took their toll on Henry, who died, following a crisis, on October 1, 1925, in the relatively young age of 61. Her son believed that the efforts of the previous four years contributed to her death.

While people praised his extraordinary legal career, many co-religionists, as nationalist MP TP O’Connor pointed out, hated “that this man of Celtic blood and of the Catholic faith sits in the ranks of the Orangemen”.

:: Cormac Moore is the author of Birth of the Border: The Impact of Partition in Ireland (Merrion Press, 2019).

]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/partition-100-years-later-denis-henry-the-catholic-trade-unionist-who-was-the-first-lord-chief-justice-of-northern-ireland/feed/ 0
Curti Panchayat Finds Unknown Tombs, Locks Last Sacraments Site | Goa News https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/curti-panchayat-finds-unknown-tombs-locks-last-sacraments-site-goa-news/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/curti-panchayat-finds-unknown-tombs-locks-last-sacraments-site-goa-news/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 23:26:00 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/curti-panchayat-finds-unknown-tombs-locks-last-sacraments-site-goa-news/ Ponda: After noting a disparity in the number of burials conducted in their interfaith crematorium and funeral complex compared to the actual records kept by them, the Curti-Khandepar panchayat placed a door at the entrance to allow use of the site. Spread over the 17,000 m² of land near Deep Nagar Curti, a suburb of […]]]>
Ponda: After noting a disparity in the number of burials conducted in their interfaith crematorium and funeral complex compared to the actual records kept by them, the Curti-Khandepar panchayat placed a door at the entrance to allow use of the site.
Spread over the 17,000 m² of land near Deep Nagar Curti, a suburb of the town of Ponda, the complex has a crematorium for Hindus and a cemetery for Catholics, Muslims and other communities who wish perform the final rites.
Since the crematorium does not have a shed for the cremation of Hindu bodies, these final rites are conducted at the Ponda “Muktidham” crematorium, while Catholics have their own cemetery in Ponda. The Curti complex is mainly used by migrants to bury their dead.
“When we visited the complex, we found over 300 graves there, but the panchayat recorded barely 65 rites. The complex has been in use for 15 years and it is difficult to calculate how many bodies were buried in the cemetery during this period, ”said sarpanch Gurudas Khedekar.
He said that such uncontrolled use of the site also resulted in loss of income for the panchayat and as a result, they posted the cell phone number of the secretary of the panchayat so that people could contact him to get a receipt after they had made the necessary payments to the panchayat to perform the final rites.
The panchayat erected a compound wall and a gate around the complex. The door has been locked and the civic body is considering appointing someone at the complex to manage the site, the sarpanch added.
He said they even discovered that people living nearby were using the road leading to the complex to park their vehicles. Such attempts will now be halted, Khedekar said.
The complex lacks some basic facilities such as a shed with seating for those attending the final rites and a water connection. The panchayat would try to put them in place soon, he said.
]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/curti-panchayat-finds-unknown-tombs-locks-last-sacraments-site-goa-news/feed/ 0
The bizarre landmark built by a man obsessed with number three https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-bizarre-landmark-built-by-a-man-obsessed-with-number-three/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-bizarre-landmark-built-by-a-man-obsessed-with-number-three/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 15:00:00 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-bizarre-landmark-built-by-a-man-obsessed-with-number-three/ Leaving an unmarked country lane in the heart of Northamptonshire could see you land in front of one of the county’s most distinctive landmarks. Just as imposing as Althorp House or Delapre Abbey but a little smaller, the Triangular Lodge has been around for over 400 years. An unusual piece of history, the Grade I […]]]>

Leaving an unmarked country lane in the heart of Northamptonshire could see you land in front of one of the county’s most distinctive landmarks.

Just as imposing as Althorp House or Delapre Abbey but a little smaller, the Triangular Lodge has been around for over 400 years.

An unusual piece of history, the Grade I Madness was devised by Sir Thomas Thresham, a household name perhaps best known as the father of one of the men behind the failed gunpowder plot. cannon aiming to detonate King James I and Parliament in 1605.

READ MORE: Iconic part of Wicksteed Park to reopen for the first time since the 1980s

Architect and landowner from Northamptonshire, a glance at his lodge leaves no doubt about his particular fascination – number three.

The triangular lodge is an impressive legacy of Thresham’s deep devotion to his Roman Catholicism and to the Holy Trinity in particular.

Built in 1597, it is the ultimate expression of rebellion at a time when Catholicism was illegal, and a period that saw him fined and imprisoned again and again for refusing to attend the services of the ‘Church of England.

Find out how you can get more NorthantsLive news straight to your inbox HERE.



The impressive triangular pavilion

And while construction on the lodge began in 1593, the idea of ​​insanity began before that when, while in prison, he began his plans to create a declaration of faith after covering his prison cell with letters. , numbers and symbolic dates.

Not only does it have three sides, each 33 feet long, but there are also three floors at the lodge, three gables on each side topped with three gargoyles, and three trefoil windows on each wall – a shape made up of three overlapping rings used in Christian symbolism.

Each floor itself takes the form of a hexagonal piece, in turn leaving three triangles in each corner.

And if that wasn’t enough, the inscription on the facade of the building – ‘Tres Testimonium Dant – translates to the biblical quote’ there are three who bear witness’.

In addition to its biblical significance, however, there is a more personal touch that Thesham conceived of with his family in mind. With ‘Good Tres’ also his wife’s nickname for him, it looks like he enjoyed a good pun as well.

The number three is significant in Catholicism in many ways and is repeated in the scriptures – for example, Jesus fell three times while carrying the cross, there were three crosses on Calvary Hill and he was buried but rose from the dead the third day.

In addition to the Triangular Lodge, Thresham, also known as Thomas the Builder, is best known for his larger and more mysterious construction project found at Aldwinkle.

The half-built Elizabethan lodge at Lyveden New Bield is an unfinished summer house now owned by the National Trust. The Category I building is classified as a building of exceptional interest, remaining largely in the same condition as it was 400 years ago when it was constructed.

Although the reason why it was never completed is still unknown to this day, the remarkable building and surrounding estate of Lyveden have also become a popular local attraction.

Find out how you can get more NorthantsLive news straight to your inbox HERE.

]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-bizarre-landmark-built-by-a-man-obsessed-with-number-three/feed/ 0
The British Museum’s exhibit on St. Thomas Becket gives a sympathetic look into the past https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-british-museums-exhibit-on-st-thomas-becket-gives-a-sympathetic-look-into-the-past/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-british-museums-exhibit-on-st-thomas-becket-gives-a-sympathetic-look-into-the-past/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 08:00:18 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-british-museums-exhibit-on-st-thomas-becket-gives-a-sympathetic-look-into-the-past/ LONDON – In a gallery at the British Museum, light shines on an array of medieval crosses, reliquaries and manuscripts, while an audiovisual exhibit recreates one of the most notorious crimes in English history. In the center, three stained glass windows, painstakingly transferred from Canterbury Cathedral, convey images of the legendary afterlife of Saint Thomas […]]]>

LONDON – In a gallery at the British Museum, light shines on an array of medieval crosses, reliquaries and manuscripts, while an audiovisual exhibit recreates one of the most notorious crimes in English history.

In the center, three stained glass windows, painstakingly transferred from Canterbury Cathedral, convey images of the legendary afterlife of Saint Thomas Becket (1120-1170), alongside the badges and souvenirs left by generations of pilgrims to his place. of martyrdom.

When the ‘Murder and Make a Saint’ exhibit opened in May, as England’s coronavirus lockdown was eased, curators said they hoped to portray Becket’s journey from a humble clerk to one of the most popular holy miracles in Europe.

Three months later, after drawing record crowds for the 850th anniversary of his death, many are struck by the warm evocation of the exposition of the country’s Catholic past and the dramatic reconstruction of the centrality of the church and of the faith.

“There is no doubt that the long-held anti-Catholicism here is now dissipating, allowing a more sympathetic understanding of the past, which cultural events like this can subtly reflect,” said Jesuit Father Timothy Byron, historian, at Catholic News Service.

“There are issues around our religious and cultural identity and how we assess our history and a better climate now to debate the place of our Catholic and Protestant traditions.”

Born in London, Becket studied in France and Italy, before becoming a senior lay official in Canterbury for Archbishop Theobald de Bec.

In 1155, he was appointed chancellor of King Henry II, responsible for royal revenues, becoming a close and trusted confidant; just seven years later, after the death of Archbishop Theobald, the king appointed him Archbishop of Canterbury.

The top post of the church carried great wealth and power. But Becket, a fine horseman and sword fighter, was not even a priest. The surprise meeting therefore also required, in the words of the commissioners, “a certain staging”.

The exhibit includes artifacts from Becket’s early London life, a rare document bearing his seal, and an alabaster altar panel depicting him blessing on his episcopal consecration just one day after his ordination.

The exhibit also noted that the king’s neat arrangement quickly fell apart.

Henry had expected his new chancellor-archbishop to obey his orders, but Becket adopted an ascetic lifestyle and opposed the king’s authority, especially when he sought to tighten control over the church with a series of statutes in 1164.

As tensions grew, Becket fled abroad under the protection of the King of France, while the Pope negotiated on his behalf.

He finally returned at the end of 1170 and was killed in Canterbury on December 29 by four knights who had witnessed the King’s Christmas tirade against “the wretched drones and traitors” he had “fed and promoted” in his royal house.

Evidence indicates that the intruders planned to take Becket to Winchester. When he resisted, they lost control and slaughtered the archbishop to death in his cathedral during vespers.

Becket’s violent end, captured by five eyewitness accounts, shocked Europe – sending, in the words of the conservatives, “strong echoes through the centuries.”

His cult of the martyr developed rapidly, and just 26 months later he was canonized by Pope Alexander III, making Canterbury the first pilgrimage center in Europe after Rome, Jerusalem and Saint-Jacques-de- Compostela.

Its four disgraced murderers later died while serving in the Holy Land by papal order, while in 1174 Henry II begged forgiveness.

Becket’s fame is recalled in objects such as a golden blue-green coffin, which is said to have contained fragments of his bones or bloody clothing, as well as in the cathedral window “Miracle Windows”, depicting healings during of his intercession.

An original copy of “The Canterbury Tales” by Geoffrey Chaucer, the first book printed in English, shows how Becket’s story quickly took root in the public imagination.

Father Byron, the historian, believes that the enduring cult of Becket illustrates how popular devotions can last for centuries, against all efforts to diminish them, if the “soft power” they represent is effectively harnessed and directed. .

Joseph Shaw, an Oxford lecturer on medieval philosophy, agrees and is struck by Becket’s sympathetic portrayal in the exhibit.

“Catholics have often been portrayed here as peddlers of weird superstitions – but this exhibit shows a detachment from bigotry and a genuine willingness to engage with what Becket has achieved,” Shaw told CNS. “While this shows that there are two sides to history, it also reflects today’s greater openness, which allows people to look at art, theology, and history more objectively. . “

During the 16th century Reformation, King Henry VIII declared that Becket “was no longer a saint, but a traitor to the crown”. All references to Becket were removed from the prayer books, as the king proclaimed his party’s end – a move that shocked Europe and hastened Henry’s excommunication.

People have drawn parallels between Becket and the new generation of Reformation-era martyrs, most notably St. Thomas More, who was also royal chancellor. The English Catholic College in Rome, training priests for the secret ministry, promoted Becket “as a model of emulation.”

The exhibit includes a carved marble base from the desecrated tomb of Becket, found in a river near Canterbury, as well as a bone fragment from the saint’s skull, which was smuggled abroad around a Jesuit college exiled in France.

Shaw thinks Becket’s connection to the exhibit’s subsequent Catholic persecutions is significant.

“It is a reminder that even after the terrible destruction of the Reformation, Catholicism still remained the true faith of many English people,” Shaw told CNS.

Ruth Cornett, art historian from Northern Ireland, admits that it is difficult for an exhibition to capture complex historical ideas through material objects or to trace the political and ecclesiastical divisions of modern minds. But the exhibit shows what was lost to spiritual life due to the Reformation conflicts, she said, and will resonate with people familiar with the modern murder of the Frankish clergy, as well as with images of cultural and artistic vandalism from Afghanistan to Syria.

“Becket’s instant fame across Europe, where Christians were horrified by his plight, shows how the church of the day knew no borders,” Cornett told CNS.

“Today, when education is key, exhibits like this can help expand knowledge and understanding, challenging perceived truths about the past.”

]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-british-museums-exhibit-on-st-thomas-becket-gives-a-sympathetic-look-into-the-past/feed/ 0
What does the rise of antichristianism mean for freedom? – GIS reports https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/what-does-the-rise-of-antichristianism-mean-for-freedom-gis-reports/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/what-does-the-rise-of-antichristianism-mean-for-freedom-gis-reports/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 06:09:34 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/what-does-the-rise-of-antichristianism-mean-for-freedom-gis-reports/ Marxism has led to more murders than any other ideology in the history of mankind. Including famines caused by planned famine in the Soviet Union (Ukraine in particular) and China (as part of the “Great Leap Forward”), the number of politically motivated murders easily exceeds 100 million. The purges ordered by Joseph Stalin and Mao […]]]>

Marxism has led to more murders than any other ideology in the history of mankind. Including famines caused by planned famine in the Soviet Union (Ukraine in particular) and China (as part of the “Great Leap Forward”), the number of politically motivated murders easily exceeds 100 million. The purges ordered by Joseph Stalin and Mao Zedong were horrific, but by no means the only such cases. In other communist countries, a tragic amount of blood has been shed in the name of Marxism. One thinks of the barbaric regime of Pol Pot in Cambodia, which massacred nearly a quarter of the country’s population.

Communism and National Socialism are both inhumane ideologies. Besides all the deaths they have caused and their use of the term “socialist” to describe their views, they share something else in common: a hatred of Christianity, especially of the Catholic Church.

One would have hoped that the West would realize that Marxism was a total failure

Here it should be noted that although the Catholic Church had official relations with Nazi Germany, it remained firmly opposed to its policies, especially on race and ethnicity. Many Catholic priests were imprisoned in concentration camps. The official position of the party and its leadership was fiercely anti-Catholic. The only reason the Nazis did not persecute Catholics more than they did was because they feared it would weaken the war effort.

Fortunately, it is generally accepted that National Socialism was a horrible aberration. Likewise, with the collapse of the Soviet Union, one would have hoped that most Westerners would realize that Marxism was not only a murderous and cruel ideology, but also a total economic and social failure. Yet it now appears that such hopes would have been misplaced.

Marxism is on the rise

Today, the bureaucracy increasingly restricts personal freedom and property rights. Inflated government programs, rising taxes and lax monetary policy lead to a “soft” system of expropriation and redistribution. Some aspects of political correctness become dogmas, stifling free and open debate. In some universities, this dogmatic mindset takes precedence over hard evidence.

Curiously, Marxism is more and more accepted. Few of the media and politicians see a problem with people who espouse Marxist views taking leadership positions. Of course, everyone has the right to believe in Marxist theories as long as they do not impose them on others. But the momentum of that sentiment has reached staggering proportions. Just two years ago, Jean-Claude Juncker, then President of the European Commission, participated in the unveiling of a monument to Karl Marx and praised his philosophical views.

Mr Juncker paid no political price for this blunder and offered no apology. Yet Marxism, in its essence, is incompatible with freedom and democracy.

Christianity under fire

In contrast, antagonism towards Christianity in general, and the Catholic Church in particular, is on the rise in Europe. Unfortunately, wrongdoing has been committed in the name of the Church, and by some of its officials, who bear responsibility for it. The Church is now addressing these issues.

Christianity made it possible for a liberal and secular society to flourish

However, being a Christian does not harm democracy or a free society. Quite the contrary. Christianity, with its notions of personal choice and freedom of conscience, is one of the foundations that allowed a liberal and secular society to flourish.

Nonetheless, there is a sort of witch-hunt going on in European politics. This became clear in 2004, when the Italian government proposed to European Affairs Minister Rocco Buttiglioni to take over the Justice and Home Affairs portfolio at the European Commission. The President of the Commission at the time, José Manuel Barroso, accepted the nomination. The European Parliament, however, rejected his candidacy because of his Catholic views.

There is more striking evidence of this trend, and we can even see it today. In the German election campaign, the Social Democrats attempt to defame Christian Democrat candidate Armin Laschet as being under the “dangerous” influence of the Catholic Church.

The growing popularity of the idea that Catholicism could be a threat to society is of concern. It is all the more worrying that Marxism appears to be perceived as a lesser danger. The anti-Catholic movement is part of a growing wave of dogmatic propaganda against religion in general. Such slanders are carcinogenic to a free society and an alarming new political dynamic.

]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/what-does-the-rise-of-antichristianism-mean-for-freedom-gis-reports/feed/ 0
Catholic priest murdered in France, says country’s interior minister – Catholic Telegraph https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/catholic-priest-murdered-in-france-says-countrys-interior-minister-catholic-telegraph/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/catholic-priest-murdered-in-france-says-countrys-interior-minister-catholic-telegraph/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 13:08:03 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/catholic-priest-murdered-in-france-says-countrys-interior-minister-catholic-telegraph/ by CNA staff Paris, France, Aug 9, 2021 / 5:40 AM The French Interior Minister announced Monday that a Catholic priest had been assassinated in western France. Gérald Darmanin wrote on his Twitter account on August 9 that he was traveling to the French department of Vendée after the murder. “All my support for the […]]]>

by CNA staff

Paris, France, Aug 9, 2021 / 5:40 AM

The French Interior Minister announced Monday that a Catholic priest had been assassinated in western France.

Gérald Darmanin wrote on his Twitter account on August 9 that he was traveling to the French department of Vendée after the murder.

“All my support for the Catholics of our country after the tragic murder of a priest in Vendée. I’m going to the scene, “he said.

He gave no further information about the incident.

The diocese of Luçon, which includes the department of Vendée, appointed the murdered priest Bro. Olivier Maire, provincial superior of the Montfort Missionaries (the Company of Mary).

On her Twitter account, she wrote that Bishop François Jacolin de Luçon and the diocese of Luçon “express their deep sadness and sadness” following the news of the murder.

“Bishop Jacolin and the diocese of Luçon share the immense sorrow of his family and of the whole Montfortian family.

France Info reported that the suspect in the murder of Saint-Laurent-sur-Sèvre, a commune in the Vendée department, was already under investigation in connection with the fire at Nantes cathedral in July 2020.

Reuters reported that the suspect surrendered to police.

French media said the 60-year-old priest welcomed the 40-year-old suspect, identified by media as Emmanuel Abayisenga, to the community of Saint-Laurent-sur-Sèvre after the fire.

The incident immediately sparked a political row, with Marine Le Pen, president of the National Rally, an anti-immigration party, accusing the authorities of not having expelled the suspect, identified on social media as a man of Rwandan origin.

“In France, you can be an illegal immigrant, set fire to Nantes cathedral, never be deported, then reoffend by murdering a priest, “she wrote on Twitter.

Darmanin rejected the criticism.

“Rather than expressing her compassion for the Catholics who welcomed this murderer, Ms. Le Pen argues without knowing the facts: this foreigner could not be deported despite his deportation order as long as his judicial control had not been lifted “he replied.

Le Pen is preparing to challenge the French presidential election against incumbent President Emmanuel Macron in April 2022.

Cardinal Robert Sarah, former prefect of the Vatican Congregation for Divine Worship, responded to the news by invoking the intercession of Saint Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort, founder of the Company of Mary, and of Saint John Paul II, pope from 1978 to 2005.

“St. Louis-Marie Grignion de Montfort and Saint John Paul II, stay with us, we implore you”, he wrote on his Twitter account.

Brother Hugues de Woillemont, secretary general of the bishops’ conference of France, expressed “his pain and his incomprehension” in the face of the murder.

In a homily preached in October 2020, Fr. Maire spoke of the importance of serving those on the “periphery”, citing the last encyclical of Pope Francis Fratelli tutti.

“Let us dare to sit down for a time of fraternal sharing, let us dare to sit down with the poorest, the excluded and the rejected of humanity”, he said.

This is a developing story.

]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/catholic-priest-murdered-in-france-says-countrys-interior-minister-catholic-telegraph/feed/ 0
Church to lead with joy and gratitude, even in pandemic, says Bishop Edward C. Malesic – Morning Journal https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/church-to-lead-with-joy-and-gratitude-even-in-pandemic-says-bishop-edward-c-malesic-morning-journal/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/church-to-lead-with-joy-and-gratitude-even-in-pandemic-says-bishop-edward-c-malesic-morning-journal/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 22:31:20 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/church-to-lead-with-joy-and-gratitude-even-in-pandemic-says-bishop-edward-c-malesic-morning-journal/ In this time of pandemic and uncertainty, Catholics in the Cleveland area must have an attitude of joyful gratitude to lead others to Jesus, said the head of the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland. On August 6, Bishop Edward C. Malesic addressed Elyria at the reopening of the Lorain County First Friday Forum for its first […]]]>

In this time of pandemic and uncertainty, Catholics in the Cleveland area must have an attitude of joyful gratitude to lead others to Jesus, said the head of the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland.

On August 6, Bishop Edward C. Malesic addressed Elyria at the reopening of the Lorain County First Friday Forum for its first gathering in over a year.

The First Friday Forum is a series of monthly breakfasts with speakers discussing issues of faith, theology and the Catholic Church.

About 190 people came to Lorain County Community College for Malesic’s speech.

Malesic was installed in the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland in September, succeeding Bishop Nelson Perez, who became Archbishop of the Diocese of Philadelphia.

On August 6, 2021, approximately 190 people attended to hear from the Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland, Edward C. Malesic, as the Lorain County First Friday Forum resumed after a hiatus of more than a year due to the new coronavirus pandemic. In a pandemic and beyond, Catholics in the Cleveland area must have an attitude of gratitude and good humor to lead others to Jesus, he said.

As he visited parishes in northern Ohio, it emerged that the First Friday Forum was his first major public speech in Lorain County.

His speech focused on his background and career before the novel coronavirus pandemic, life and the Catholic Church during the worst of COVID-19 and what Catholics in the region need to do next.

To set up

Malesic said he sometimes felt like the father of a family with 650,000 children – and sometimes they quarreled.

Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, he said the residents of northern Ohio are some of the warmest and friendliest people he has ever known.

Mass, prayer and evangelism continued during the pandemic, Malesic said, and everyone did their best.

Malesic has advocated for people to get vaccinated against COVID-19 as the best way to stop the spread of the disease.

Later in his speech, he conceded that parish priests could also help parishioners get vaccinated.

But a personal conversation about the vaccine might be more compelling than preaching it from the pulpit, Malesic said.

The requirement for attendance at mass has been suspended at the worst of the pandemic, he said.

Catholics are again required to attend their churches for Sunday worship.

There is new uncertainty as cases of COVID-19 now increase, especially among the unvaccinated, Malesic said.

People and parishes need to balance the vaccine with their need for community.

“We need to be together, we just need to be together,” Malesic said. “We’re Catholic Americans, we’re used to getting things done, and we will. “

School in session

During the pandemic, many Catholic schools remained open with distance learning and in-person classes were not a major source of the spread of COVID-19, Malesic said.

Even before the pandemic, Catholic schools faced declining enrollment, rising costs and challenges for leadership, he said.

Yet schools are the best ministry for educating young people about Jesus, Malesic said.

Malesic has launched ‘Keeping the Faith: The Future of Catholic Elementary Schools’, an initiative with a team that will draft a strategic plan by May 2022, for implementation during the 2022-2023 school year.

The goal is to identify strategies to keep schools grounded in the Catholic faith while striving for academic excellence and being as available and affordable as possible, Malesic said.

He added that he hopes the plan will become a model for parish religion schools, high schools and adult religious training.

Count your blessings

Catholics are blessed people and they should act as though they are blessed and be grateful for the blessings, Malesic said.

No one wants to join a church full of complainers, he said.

These are difficult times with a pandemic, intense political divisions, tensions in the church and attacks on life in the womb and on the family, which is the lifeblood of the country, Malesic said.

There seems to be a general air of incivility, outrage, agitation, violence and general confusion everywhere everywhere – none of which is a sign of the fruits of the Holy Spirit, Malesic said.

He cited the Bible, including Peter’s first letter, Paul’s letters to the Ephesians and Thessalonians.

These passages command Catholics to recognize their gifts, use them to serve others, and give thanks to God in all things, Malesic said.

Gratitude is embedded in everything Catholics do, Malesic said, citing John 3:16, one of the most famous passages in the New Testament about God giving the gift of Jesus his son for the salvation of the world.

“If we truly believe this, then hope flows and gratitude abounds, even during the difficult times we live in,” he said.

The Lorain County First Friday Forum will continue with speakers in September, October and November.

For more information, call the reservation line at 440-244-0643 or email ffflorain@gmail.com.

On August 6, 2021, approximately 190 people attended to hear from the Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland, Edward C. Malesic, as the Lorain County First Friday Forum resumed after a hiatus of more than a year due to the new coronavirus pandemic. In a pandemic and beyond, Catholics in the Cleveland area must have an attitude of gratitude and good humor to lead others to Jesus, he said.
]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/church-to-lead-with-joy-and-gratitude-even-in-pandemic-says-bishop-edward-c-malesic-morning-journal/feed/ 0
New Catholic Bishop of Peoria Louis Tylka looks back on his first year https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/new-catholic-bishop-of-peoria-louis-tylka-looks-back-on-his-first-year/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/new-catholic-bishop-of-peoria-louis-tylka-looks-back-on-his-first-year/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 10:18:21 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/new-catholic-bishop-of-peoria-louis-tylka-looks-back-on-his-first-year/ When he first arrived in the Peoria area, Louis Tylka didn’t know much about it. After a year and 27,000 miles on his vehicle, that is no longer true. Previously a longtime pastor in the Chicago area, Tylka became coadjutor bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Peoria in an elaborate but pandemic-limited ceremony on July […]]]>

When he first arrived in the Peoria area, Louis Tylka didn’t know much about it. After a year and 27,000 miles on his vehicle, that is no longer true.

Previously a longtime pastor in the Chicago area, Tylka became coadjutor bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Peoria in an elaborate but pandemic-limited ceremony on July 23 at St. Mary’s Cathedral.

Tylka’s title means he is heir to current Bishop Daniel Jenky when he retires, likely early next year. This gave Tylka time for a crash course regarding the Diocese of Peoria, which spans 26 counties and 160 parishes and includes more than 120,000 Catholics.

Previously:Eventual Catholic Bishop of Peoria ordained in COVID-tinged ceremony

Bloomington-Normal, Champaign-Urbana, LaSalle-Peru and the Quad Cities are part of the Diocese of Peoria. That meant a lot of travel for Tylka, 51, from the southern suburbs of Chicago.

]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/new-catholic-bishop-of-peoria-louis-tylka-looks-back-on-his-first-year/feed/ 0
Catholics pick up crutches and canes in Saco area to help Africans in need https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/catholics-pick-up-crutches-and-canes-in-saco-area-to-help-africans-in-need/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/catholics-pick-up-crutches-and-canes-in-saco-area-to-help-africans-in-need/#respond Thu, 05 Aug 2021 08:00:33 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/catholics-pick-up-crutches-and-canes-in-saco-area-to-help-africans-in-need/ Most Holy Trinity Church in Saco collects crutches, wheelchairs and canes for “Crutches 4 Africa”, an organization that has collected, shipped and distributed over 160,000 mobility devices in more than 20 African countries. Courtesy photo CESO – A large collection box in the lobby of Most Holy Trinity Church, located at 271 Main Street in […]]]>

Most Holy Trinity Church in Saco collects crutches, wheelchairs and canes for “Crutches 4 Africa”, an organization that has collected, shipped and distributed over 160,000 mobility devices in more than 20 African countries. Courtesy photo

CESO – A large collection box in the lobby of Most Holy Trinity Church, located at 271 Main Street in Saco, will soon be stocked with crutches, canes and wheelchairs to help fill the hearts and needs of Africans without access to reliable mobility devices.

“Once our boxes are full, we can call Saco Rotary to come and empty them so new donations can be placed inside,” said Bonnie Buechs, social justice president for Good Shepherd Ward, of which Most Holy Trinity Church is part.

The process is part of Good Shepherd Parish’s support of “Crutches 4 Africa”, an organization that has collected, shipped and distributed over 160,000 mobility devices in more than 20 African countries.

“While in Uganda in 2005, I saw people who had survived polio. Often they are rejected in their communities, ”said Dave Talbot, founder of“ Crutches 4 Africa ”. “I realized that many people have a lightly used mobility device that they no longer need because of a bent ankle, a skiing accident or an operation. I’ve seen crutches in garage sales, in dumpsters and, unfortunately, in landfill containers. I knew I had to do something.

“Crutches 4 Africa” was born and many benevolent groups across the country responded quickly by supporting the cause, including Good Shepherd Parish, which continually encourages donations from parishioners and community members in Saco, Biddeford, Lyman and Old Orchard. Beach. This year’s collection will run until September.

“We have been doing this for many years,” Buechs said. “Their mission is to deliver mobility devices and distribute them for free, regardless of a person’s race, gender, tribe, age or religion. This project is making a huge difference to so many people and we are happy to lend a helping hand.

To donate, simply bring a mobility device into the lobby of Most Holy Trinity Church in Saco. For more information, contact Good Shepherd Parish at (207) 282-3321.

]]>
https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/catholics-pick-up-crutches-and-canes-in-saco-area-to-help-africans-in-need/feed/ 0