Catholic historical society – Catholic Record Society http://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 02:20:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Catholic historical society – Catholic Record Society http://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/ 32 32 The care team at the Hospice of the Western Reserve helps the client make two wishes come true: A place in the sun https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-care-team-at-the-hospice-of-the-western-reserve-helps-the-client-make-two-wishes-come-true-a-place-in-the-sun/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-care-team-at-the-hospice-of-the-western-reserve-helps-the-client-make-two-wishes-come-true-a-place-in-the-sun/#respond Tue, 24 Aug 2021 21:27:11 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-care-team-at-the-hospice-of-the-western-reserve-helps-the-client-make-two-wishes-come-true-a-place-in-the-sun/ LAKEWOOD, Ohio – When Emanuel Flagg began receiving care from the home care team at Lakewood Hospice of the Western Reserve, he told the social worker he still had two things on his to-do list. : go bowling with your family and ride a horse. Lori Scotese and Lisa Waryck, Head of Volunteer Services, got […]]]>

LAKEWOOD, Ohio – When Emanuel Flagg began receiving care from the home care team at Lakewood Hospice of the Western Reserve, he told the social worker he still had two things on his to-do list. : go bowling with your family and ride a horse.

Lori Scotese and Lisa Waryck, Head of Volunteer Services, got to work to make sure both wishes come true through HWR’s unforgettable moments., a program that improves the quality of life of patients by responding to their particular wishes.

For the first wish, a gift card was given so that Flagg could offer his family a game of bowling.

Then, a few weeks ago, his second wish came true when he was able to ride a horse.

“Mr. Flagg was ready to wear his cowboy outfit, including a cowboy hat and cowboy boots,” said Julia Wasilewski, hospice social worker. “I joined him. at Valley Riding, located at Rocky River Stables in the Cleveland Metroparks.

“The instructor was called Marty and the beautiful horse was Merlin. Marty was wonderful, to say the least. She not only helped Mr. Flagg ride horses, but also provided him with a lot of education.

“We have learned a few facts: horses speak with their tails and the horse’s eyes are their best defense mechanism,” Wasilewski said.

“Marty showed Mr. Flagg how to brush Merlin and allowed him to help him. Mr. Flagg was a natural. He circled the arena several times and gave orders to Merlin. Merlin turned out to be a great listener, ”she said.

“At the end, I asked Mr. Flagg what motivated him to do this,” Wasilewski said.

He told her, “I raised five children on my own and I didn’t have time to experience things like this.

He said he loved watching westerns and had always wanted to ride a horse.

“I’m so excited that we were able to do this for him,” Wasilewski said. “We were finally able to make his dream come true. “

Thanks to Laurie Henrichsen, public relations and media manager at the Hospice of the Western Reserve, for sharing the information and the photo.

Little wonders: Over 60 dollhouses and bedroom boxes will be on display at the Small Wonders Miniatures Show September 11 through October 3 at historic Nicholson House, 13335 Detroit Ave., Lakewood.

The displays represent medieval times to the present day. The event will feature items from local collectors and the Western Reserve Historical Society.

The event benefits the Lakewood Historical Society. Tickets are on sale for $ 15 for adults and $ 5 for children 3 to 12 years old. No strollers are allowed.

Show hours are 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on September 11, 12, 18, 19, 25 and 16, and October 2 and 3.

For more information, email lhsminiaturesshow@gmail.com or call 216-221-7343.

Cruise advantage: The Ascension Lutheran Church, 28081 Lorain Road, North Olmsted, will be hosting its 12th annual car cruise to benefit the church parking lot. The event begins at 4 p.m. on September 1. The rainy date is September 2.

The event is free, but visitors are asked to donate canned food to benefit the Oxcart Pantry and the Redeemer Crisis Center.

There will be refreshments and live music by the Crooked River Band. For more information, call 440-759-8201.

Church visits: The West Park Historical Society will be offering a tour of four area churches on September 19.

Advance reservations must be made by September 8th. The cost is $ 20. Make checks payable to West Park Historical Society, c / o Marge Sheridan, 3808 W. 129th St., Cleveland, Ohio 44111.

Participants must be 12 years of age or older and must have their own transportation. All churches are accessible to ADA.

There will be refreshments after the visit at the West Park Historical Society, 17401 Lorain Ave. in the West Park neighborhood of Cleveland. Parking is available at Citizens Bank on the south side of Lorain.

The churches on the tour are:

St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, 4427 Rocky River Drive at Puritas Avenue

· Second Calvary Baptist Missionary Church, 12017 Emery Ave. to Bellaire Road

Beth Israel-The Temple West, 14308 Triskett Road (north side of the street, with parking in front of Stuart House)

Bethany English Lutheran Church, 15460 Triskett Road

For more information, call 216-252-2514.

Meet the candidates: The Lakewood Chapter of the League of Voters of Greater Cleveland and the Lakewood Chamber of Commerce will be hosting an Open House Meet the Candidates from 9 a.m. to noon on August 28 under the Kiwanis Pavilion in Lakewood Park, 14532 Lake Ave., Lakewood.

The event is free and open to the public. Participants will have the opportunity to meet and chat with the candidates running in Lakewood ahead of the September 14 primary election.

Those present are requested to wear a face mask.

Work is progressing on improvements to Brookpark Road in North Olmsted. This photo shows the area near the Great Northern Mall. (Carol Kovach / special for cleveland.com)

Road works: Those traveling on Brookpark Road in North Olmsted have likely noticed the bumper crop of orange cones that has sprouted this summer as improvements are made to the busy street. Signs are warning motorists to expect delays as the project progresses.

When completed, drivers can enjoy smooth navigation on the freshly repaved and improved pavement.

Poster contest winners: The Cuyahoga Soil and Water Conservation District recently hosted its 2021 District Poster Contest for Cuyahoga County.

This year’s theme was “Healthy Forests, Healthy Communities”.

Moira Burke, a student at St. Angela Merici School in Fairview Park, finished first in the seventh to ninth grade category in the state competition. His poster was sent to the national competition sponsored by the National Association of Conservation Districts and the NACD Auxiliary. The winners of the national competition will be announced in February.

The following students from Cuyahoga County are also recognized as the winners of the 2021 Ohio Poster Contest:

• Jaxon Dea, Charles A. Mooney School in the Old Brooklyn neighborhood of Cleveland, second place, classes K-1

• Andrew Studeny, St. Angela Merici School, Fairview Park, third place, grades 2-3

• Natalie Hooper, St. Angela Merici School, second place, grades 4-6

• Anna Buhrow, Beaumont School, Cleveland Heights, third place, grades 10-12.

Congratulations to all the winners.

The CSWD is organizing a 2022 poster competition on the theme “Healthy Soils: Healthy Lives”. Students can begin work on their posters as of January 1, 2022 – George Washington Carver’s birthday – to honor Carver’s contributions to the field of soil science.

Teachers can register their courses online before April 1. Submissions must be received by 6:00 p.m. on Earth Day, April 22. Detailed instructions will be available in January at cuyahogaswcd.org.

For more information, contact Jacki Zevenbergen at 216-524-6580, ext. 1006, or jzevenbergen@cuyahogaswcd.org. Or visit cuyahogaswcd.org.

Singing Angels auditions: Children from grades four to 16 are invited to audition for the Singing Angels, the region’s most diverse and unique choir.

Kids can audition this fall and participate at no cost – a way for the Singing Angels to show their gratitude for the community’s support during the pandemic.

Auditions will take place from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on September 1 and from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on September 4 at the Singing Angels Studios, 3600 Biddulph Ave., Suite A, in Cleveland. No appointment is necessary. For those who cannot do it in person, online auditions are accepted at singerangels.org.

As a singing angel, children learn to perform while strengthening their music reading skills and appropriate vocal technique, cultivating an environment where singers gain valuable leadership skills and develop personally and emotionally. A trained voice isn’t necessary – just a pleasant voice, a love of music, and a commitment to continuous improvement.

Over the past 57 years, the Singing Angels have performed in 34 countries, sang with great celebrities, accompanied symphonies and entertained dignitaries, presidents and popes. The Singing Angels has been featured on national and international television, has performed four times in the White House, and has appeared in concert with numerous celebrities.

Information, please: Readers are encouraged to share information about themselves, their families and friends, organizations, religious events, etc. in Fairview Park, Lakewood, North Olmsted and West Park for the column A Place in the Sun, which I write as a freelance. Awards, honors, milestone birthdays or anniversaries and other items are welcome. Submit the information at least 10 days before the requested publication date to carolkovach@hotmail.com.

Read more of the Sun Post Herald.


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Henri hit parts of the south coast harder than others https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/henri-hit-parts-of-the-south-coast-harder-than-others/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/henri-hit-parts-of-the-south-coast-harder-than-others/#respond Mon, 23 Aug 2021 04:05:18 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/henri-hit-parts-of-the-south-coast-harder-than-others/ After all this hype, Tropical Storm Henri was more of a punch than a punch for most of the south coast, but results can vary depending on where you weathered the storm. For some, Henry was just another in a long list of overrated storms that amounted to nothing at all. It’s hard not to […]]]>

After all this hype, Tropical Storm Henri was more of a punch than a punch for most of the south coast, but results can vary depending on where you weathered the storm.

For some, Henry was just another in a long list of overrated storms that amounted to nothing at all. It’s hard not to be concerned about how seriously SouthCoast residents may or may not take warnings before the next real hurricane arrives. Those who remember Hurricane Bob 30 years ago know what I’m talking about.

Still, “we’re going to rebuild” memes abounded on Facebook. They are always good for a chuckle. A boy from Rochester starred in a hilarious homemade video, with props thrown by someone outside of the camera.

However, we have seen significant property damage from New Bedford to Newport in some of the photos submitted to us by the public.

The waves crashed with force against the retaining walls of Mattapoisett Harbor and Ocean Drive Newport, putting them to the test.

Fallen trees have been reported across the region. One of the reasons for the number of trees that fell for the relatively mild storm was that the ground was already so saturated with water. In what has been a historically rainy summer. the soil around the tree roots has already softened a bit.

Wherever you live on the South Coast, we hope the property damage you suffered was not too severe and caused no injuries.

If you would like to submit photos of Henri, you can leave them as a comment on the Fun 107 Facebook page or send them through the Fun 107 app.

Henri hits hard for parts of the south coast, sparing others

Depending on where you weathered the storm, Henri was either a bust or a mess. Here are some photos of the entire south coast that highlight the big differences.

KEEP READING: Scroll Down to See What Headlines The Year You Was Born


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Is the Twilight saga racist? Explore race and Mormonism in the series https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/is-the-twilight-saga-racist-explore-race-and-mormonism-in-the-series/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/is-the-twilight-saga-racist-explore-race-and-mormonism-in-the-series/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 18:18:19 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/is-the-twilight-saga-racist-explore-race-and-mormonism-in-the-series/ “The Twilight Saga” has enjoyed a rebirth on Netflix over the past couple of months, much to our 2010s delight. But in the years since the first film’s release in 2008 – and the book’s publication in 2005 – analyzes and revelations about the making of the hit series have tarnished his sympathy. Among Generation […]]]>

“The Twilight Saga” has enjoyed a rebirth on Netflix over the past couple of months, much to our 2010s delight.

But in the years since the first film’s release in 2008 – and the book’s publication in 2005 – analyzes and revelations about the making of the hit series have tarnished his sympathy.

Among Generation Z, some accused “Twilight” to contain “Mormon propaganda,” which has been explored in this TikTok.

For the purposes of this article, it should be distinguished that Meyers’ more racial influences stem from Mormonism as it existed in the 1800s and 1900s, before the Church of Latter-day Saints rejected the term.

Although some black people say that racial discrimination still exists in the Church, Meyers’ books and their influences should by no means be a reflection of the attitudes of the entire Church.

Is “The Twilight Saga” racist?

From Stephanie Meyer’s alleged resistance to the selection of people of color to her racial biases more implicit in the books, there are plenty of racist moments in “The Twilight Saga”.

RELATED: How Twilight’s Toxic Relationships Normalized Underage Grooming

Stephanie Meyers is said to have resisted the casting of people of color.

Let’s start with the assertions of Catherine Hardwicke – the director of the first installment of the film series – in 2018 on Meyer’s influence on casting choices.

“I wanted the cast to be a lot more diverse,” says Hardwicke, adding that Meyer, who was raised in the Latter-day Saint Church, was resilient because of the way she envisioned her characters.



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In memoriam: Funeral notice, August 22, 2021 | Obituary https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/in-memoriam-funeral-notice-august-22-2021-obituary/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/in-memoriam-funeral-notice-august-22-2021-obituary/#respond Sun, 22 Aug 2021 08:30:13 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/in-memoriam-funeral-notice-august-22-2021-obituary/ HARPER, Dale Edward Jr., On the evening of August 13, 2021, Dale passed away peacefully in Tucson, Arizona from Alzheimer’s disease. Dale was born in Colorado Springs, CO. He was the second son of Ruth Gordon and Dale Harper, Sr. Dale graduated from Kansas State University with a double degree in biology and psychology. He […]]]>





HARPER, Dale Edward Jr.,

On the evening of August 13, 2021, Dale passed away peacefully in Tucson, Arizona from Alzheimer’s disease. Dale was born in Colorado Springs, CO. He was the second son of Ruth Gordon and Dale Harper, Sr.

Dale graduated from Kansas State University with a double degree in biology and psychology. He joined the military during the Korean conflict and served in the MASH unit in San Juan, Puerto Rico. He went to work for the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs which later became known as the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA). As an agent and holder of a commercial instrument pilot’s license, has carried out numerous surveillance missions. He was an expert on LSD labs and testified in numerous trials in San Francisco and Los Angeles, California. Pursuing his goals as an investigator, Dale became a criminal investigator for the FAA Western Region Los Angeles. The last assignment was transferred to Tucson with the US Customs Air Support Branch DMAFB. After his retirement, Dale became a private investigator. Dale is now in the sky at the controls of his beloved Cessna 140A or behind the wheel of his ’66 Mustang.

Dale was predeceased by his parents, Colonel Dale E. Harper, Sr. (US Army Attaché, retired) and Ruth Gordon Harper, Sheridan, WY; brother, Karl Harper, Laramie, WY; Aunt, General Margaret Harper, (US Army Ret) San Antonio, TX; niece, Heather Harper, Laramie, WY; sister-in-law / brother-in-law, Peggy (Rick) Rosner Sand City, CA; stepmother, Charlotte Minor, US Army Defense Language Institute, Monterey, CA, CDR Warner Minor (US Navy, Ret) VA.

Survived by his wife, Barbara; daughters, Tora and Darci; grandchildren, Emilie and Santino; sister-in-law, Tora Isi San Rafael, California; nieces, Barbi (Arthur) San Rafael, CA, Cindi (Matt) United Kingdom, Karlyn Denver, CO; nephews, Angelo Salinas, CA, David, Los Angeles, CA, Donald, Boston, MA, Peter, San Diego, CA; cousins, John, Elina, Dimitri Harper, Bend, OR, Jim, Betty Harper Littleton, CO; Norma Newman, Clifton, NJ, Joan Neglio, Bronx, NY, Chris Christensen, Fortuna, CA, Paul Christensen, Arcata, CA. Many thanks for the care and well-being of Dale by the caregiver, Tami Diaz. The plans are one for a private family service. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the charity of your choice. Arrangements by ANGEL VALLEY FUNERAL HOME.


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Johannine Anti-Tongue | Dying inmate https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/johannine-anti-tongue-dying-inmate/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/johannine-anti-tongue-dying-inmate/#respond Wed, 11 Aug 2021 05:16:37 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/johannine-anti-tongue-dying-inmate/ Johannine anti-language example / Fellow Dying Inmate / All rights reserved You can’t really understand the gospel of John without getting the Johannine anti-tongue. The light at last Sunday’s Gospel readings in John’s “Bread of Life Discourse” I recently blogged about the Johannine Anti-Tongue here and here. Linguist Michael AK Halliday and Context Group researchers […]]]>

Johannine anti-language example / Fellow Dying Inmate / All rights reserved

You can’t really understand the gospel of John without getting the Johannine anti-tongue.

The light at last Sunday’s Gospel readings in John’s “Bread of Life Discourse” I recently blogged about the Johannine Anti-Tongue here and here.

Linguist Michael AK Halliday and Context Group researchers Bruce Malina and Richard Rohrbaugh say anti-language is the language of an anti-society. And the Johannine anti-language is the language of the Johannine anti-society.

In anti-language, anti-societies communicate with initiates within the language of the dominant society against which they resist. But anti-language doesn’t welcome strangers – in fact, it’s a wall that says in big, bold letters, “STAY OUT!” Ultimately, the Johannine anti-language excluded foreigners from the Johannine anti-society. Even other groups of Jesus did not “understand” it.

How ironic, given the way Christians use the gospel of “John” today.

To see what I mean about the Johannine Anti-Speech, take a look at this overview video—

What is Johannine Anti-Speech

Researchers such as Halliday, Malina, and Rohrbaugh explain that we shouldn’t think of Johannine anti-language as jargon or technical terminology. Instead, marginalized people espouse an alternate perception of reality and, in doing so, create it. Forming an anti-society against the dominant group, they express their counter-reality through anti-language.

This is what “John” is. Stop thinking of it as a masterpiece of Christology. The author was not a theologian. His gospel is the Johannine anti-language opposing the established way of perceiving and conceiving.

Johannine anti-language and irony

American Christians who read “John” produce a rich irony. Since they are from the most individualistic society of all time, they think they love the fourth gospel called “John”. It’s a favorite for many of us. Look at how widespread interest is in “John”, or what we thought he tells us. Yet they don’t understand the Johannine anti-language. We don’t even know how to look for the interpersonal.

Ask Huston Smith to describe Jesus and Christianity. He does so almost exclusively in the “Johannine style” (see his bestseller “The religions of the worldDo you know how many ministry groups I can think of where the only Jesus you get is a hyper-version of Johannine Jesus? Just as so many seminaries teach Jesus and Christianity. And any misunderstanding of the anti- Johannine language.

WWE. NFL, & Johannine Anti-tongue

Who doesn’t like Tim Tebow? Lots of people, actually, but forget about it now. Do you remember his face paint? –John 3:16, the most important Bible verse (?? !!) of all. Where would Vince McMahon and “Stone Cold” Steve Austin be without John 3:16, eh?

Longtime football fans may remember the Arthur S. DeMoss Foundation which released “The Power of Living” during Super Bowl XVII. All this program is based on an Americanized recontextualization of “Jean” with 3:16 as its “first law”. If you’ve been to a sporting event in the past fifty years in the United States, chances are you’ve seen a banner displaying John 3:16

For God so loved the world,
that he gave his only begotten Son,
that anyone who believes in him
must not perish,
but have eternal life.
(KJV)

The problem is, what’s the context? Johannine anti-language. “The world” is not planet Earth, folks. “John” does not refer to Carl Sagan’s “pale blue dot”. He wrote several years before this conceptualization. Ultimately, there is nothing universalist (Catholic “C” or otherwise) in the literal sense of his document.

And yes, the ethnocentric god from Israel did he “love” (glue like glue to) “the world” (that is, the dominant society of first century Israel). But everything else in this gospel says that “the world” hated (rejected, detached from) their patron God so much!

By the way, first-century Israel does not (and cannot match) the modern State of Israel, an apartheid master race Zionist democracy. Plus he ain’t, can’t match jewish people. But suffering from sincere and guilty stupidity, the USCCB continues to relentlessly produce new editions of the poorly translated American Bible Youdaioi (still Judeans) like “the Jews. “When will this dangerous anachronism end?

CRU and the Americanized Gospel according to “John”

Once upon a time, I worked in Catholic campus ministry alongside many good people in a multi-faith council. One of these groups was Campus Crusade for Christ (now called “CRU”). What do you think was their main message? In perfect American individualism, Jesus is to be (vertically) the individual’s personal Lord and Savior. And where do they think the basis for this comes from? The anti-tongue gospel called “John” inspires him, except that it is not read correctly (ie as anti-Johannine tongue).

Many American feminists like what they imagine to be “John”. Sister Joan Chittister, of course. She thinks Jesus was the first feminist. Why? Because it’s right there in “John,” except it’s not. We do not read this correctly when we think of Jesus as an egalitarian. Neither the historical Jesus nor the interpretations of Jesus that we find in the Gospels present him as such.

But we don’t care. Regarding the Johannine Jesus, we don’t get the Johannine anti-tongue, and we don’t want to get it either. Jesus was not an American, and that is not good for a lot of people right and left. So what to do? Reinvent it in our idealized autobiography, a culturally sympathetic identity theft that tickles my ear. Screw honesty for relevance. To throw the real deal jesus in the trash, but let’s say we love it anyway.

Johannine anti-language reused to evangelize strangers

Consider how ministerial groups like CRU and various Catholic groups like to use “John” to evangelize people in their respective versions of Christianity. Go to “John 3:16” and “John 6”, They treat“ John ”as if it was written to convince outsiders to become initiates. And so, they treat “John” as if it was primarily a matter of conveying ideas about God and Jesus (eg, accepting Jesus as Lord and Savior or justifying Eucharistic devotions).

But being an anti-Johannine language text, “John” was never written to be understood by strangers. “To hell with those people in the dark! – this is the way of the Johannine anti-society. And his mode of communication was intended to be interpersonal (the personal qualities of communication partners), not a set of new theological ideas. “John” extremely minimizes ideation (what is said and described).

“John” VS the Synoptics

Can you honestly compare “John” (the whole Gospel as a written document excluding Chapter 21 in the appendix and the story of the adulterous woman) with the synoptic gospels? To try. If you do, you will find that the author is not conveying ideas about God and Christ. In the synoptic gospels you see, throughout the basic account, a progressive description of who Jesus is. You see enemies becoming more and more hostile towards Jesus from the beginning to the end of “Mark”, “Matthew” and “Luke”.

But that’s not how “John” is.

The only ideas “John” tells about God and Jesus are listed in John 1: 1-18, the prologue. Jesus is the word of God. He came to the Dominant Society Israel, but they rejected him (as did the fringe of the Johannine anti-society). But to all who received Jesus, he gave the power to join the Children of God (that is, the Johannine anti-society). All after verse 18 is just more of the same, repeated variations of the same musical theme.

Next time we will discuss the relevance and how “John” was read spiritually.


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COUNTY CALENDAR | County Calendar https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/county-calendar-county-calendar/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/county-calendar-county-calendar/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/county-calendar-county-calendar/ CONCERT SERIES – The Waynesburg Lions Club hosts its free summer concert series “Sounds of Summer” at the Waynesburg Lions Park Performance Pavilion on Tuesday evenings until the end of September. The musical concerts will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and the public is invited to attend. People visiting the park for […]]]>

CONCERT SERIES – The Waynesburg Lions Club hosts its free summer concert series “Sounds of Summer” at the Waynesburg Lions Park Performance Pavilion on Tuesday evenings until the end of September. The musical concerts will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and the public is invited to attend. People visiting the park for concerts are kindly requested to bring garden chairs and / or blankets. Call 724-998-6962 for more information.

CONCERT SERIES – Bring a blanket or chair to Mason-Dixon Historical Park on Saturdays August 7 and September 11 and sit back and relax to live music from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Amphitheater. Tickets are $ 5 at the door and children under 12 are free. Concessions will be on sale at the show thanks to the Red Hats Society. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/MasonDixon/events/.

CAR SHOW – The Skyview Drive-In Car Show will take place from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, August 7. Auction and more. Registration begins at 10 a.m. and costs $ 10 per car. Windshield plates for the first 100 cars. 16 trophies will be awarded.

GREENE COUNTY FAIR – The annual agricultural fair, which runs August 8-14, will again feature a full program of action-packed events, breeding competitions, live music, carnival rides and your food favorite fairgrounds. For more information, visit www.greenecountyfair.org.

4-H / FFA SALE – The 2021 Greene County 4-H and FFA Market Beef and Lamb Sale will be held on Thursday, August 12 at the County Fairgrounds, during the Greene County Fair, which lasts one week. The sale will start at 6 p.m. Approximately 42 steers and 64 lambs will be auctioned by Behm’s Auction and Real Estate Service.

FREE FESTIVAL – The County Recreation Department will present the Greene County Music Fest September 4-5. The free event will feature regional artists, headliners, a cash / gun bash night and more. Sponsorships are available. For more information, call Bret Moore at 724-852-5323.

FLASHLIGHT DRAGS – This popular event returns to Greene County Airport on Sunday, September 12. Races are not prepared, 1/8 of a mile, grudge style matches. All registered vehicles are allowed to run during basic hours from 2:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., with departures from 5:30 p.m. Rider gates open at 11:30 a.m., spectator gates open at 12 p.m. Admission is $ 40 for runners, $ 10 for spectators (children under 12 will be admitted free).

BOWLBY LIBRARY – Opening hours are:

Monday to Thursday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Fridays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Bowlby Library is hosting the following upcoming events:

n TAILS & TALES SUMMER READING – Until August 14th.

Mondays – Kindergarten Transition Classes: Children ages 4-6 will come together to learn skills that will be essential in their transition to kindergarten.

Tuesdays – Preschool storytelling lessons at 10:30 am and 1:30 pm; and toddlers at 5 p.m.

Wednesdays – The school-age day program for ages 6-12 will participate in fun projects and activities that focus on the theme of “Tails and Tales”. This will take place every Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Stories Under the Moon will also take place on Wednesdays at 5 p.m.

Thursday – Toddler time at 10:30 am and 1:30 pm; and STREAM / STEM classes at 5 p.m.

Saturdays – Block Party at 11 am which is free game for different ages of kids. The youngest can come and play with blocks of foam and wood while the older ones can participate in the Lego challenges for the day. This is intended for siblings of different age groups so parents can still enjoy the library programming but without the multiple trips.

n SUMMER READING FOR ADULTS – The library invites adults to the library this summer for the “Tails & Tales” adult summer reading program until August 14th. Read your favorite books or listen to audiobooks and win prizes all summer long. Pick up a flyer from the library or visit their website at www.evakbowlby.org. Summer readers of all ages can also follow their reading through the Beanstack app [https://evakbowlby.beanstack.com]. Create your account on a personal computer or mobile device (Apple or Android) and start earning badges and prizes today.

n ANNUAL ZOO TRIP – On Saturday, August 14, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., enjoy a family day out at the Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium. Admission is free for children 2 and under; fees for older children and adults are $ 18 per person. Pack lunch or buy lunch at the zoo. Transport costs are included in the price of admission. You must register and pay for the tickets by August 5th.

Residents are encouraged to support the Bowlby Library by visiting Eva K. Bowlby’s website or their social media channels on Facebook, Instagram or YouTube.

Call or stop by the Eva K. Bowlby Public Library for more information or to register for any of the above events.

FLENNIKEN LIBRARY – Opening hours are as follows:

Mondays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Tuesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

SUPPORT MEETINGS – Steps Inside, Inc., located at 1790 Morris St. in Waynesburg, coordinates weekly recovery and support meetings for AA, NA and Al-Anon groups. These meetings are open to the public.

AA meetings are: Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays and Sundays at noon at Steps Inside; Wednesdays and Fridays at 8 p.m. at Steps Inside; Tuesdays and Fridays at noon at First United Methodist Church in Waynesburg; and Saturdays at 8:30 p.m. at St. Ann’s Catholic Church in Waynesburg.

NA meetings are: Mondays at 7:00 p.m. at Steps Inside; Tuesdays at 7 pm at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Carmichaels; Thursdays at 8 p.m. at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church in Carmichaels; Fridays at 11 p.m. at Steps Inside and Sundays at 7 p.m. at Steps Inside.

Al-Anon meetings are: Mondays at 7:00 p.m. at St. George’s Church in Waynesburg.


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American denominational schools prepare students for college and beyond https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/american-denominational-schools-prepare-students-for-college-and-beyond/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/american-denominational-schools-prepare-students-for-college-and-beyond/#respond Fri, 06 Aug 2021 11:16:47 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/american-denominational-schools-prepare-students-for-college-and-beyond/ Ask the graduates to express what their denominational education was like, and you will get some serious criticism of how they built a strong moral foundation and how their teachers nurtured compassion. From all ages and from all walks of life, from Catholics to Evangelicals, many have spoken – and are grateful – of their […]]]>

Ask the graduates to express what their denominational education was like, and you will get some serious criticism of how they built a strong moral foundation and how their teachers nurtured compassion. From all ages and from all walks of life, from Catholics to Evangelicals, many have spoken – and are grateful – of their schooling, excited about how it has shaped their lives and world views.

A well-taught faith-based education gives students a broader perspective on life than their peers in public schools. He assumes that a person’s education is not limited to the intellectual realm, although many now prepare his students for the vagaries of the data-centric and digital-centric 21st century. Rather, it goes beyond to encompass the spiritual aspects of the person. It usually offers a carefully crafted curriculum that revolves around a traditional biblical understanding of the world and of human nature. Adjustment? Stimulating environments in which students feel safe and happy.

In these schools, students immerse themselves in a diverse community of like-minded friends, teachers and clergy, fostering an inspiring educational experience that builds character. Here are four faith-based schools in the United States that do just that:

Highland View Academy

Located on a beautiful campus in the hills of western Maryland, along the Appalachian Trail, Highland View Academy is a Seventh-day Adventist Christian school and boarding school.

Here, students grow up to become full graduates by participating in a wide variety of academic and extracurricular opportunities, including STEM Certification, college-level credit courses, competitive team sports and a robust Music program.

HVA is a home away from home for a diverse student body representing 14 nationalities. The small size of the school – the student-teacher ratio is 5: 1 – allows individualized support. Its semi-rural location eliminates distractions and its Christian worldview develops exceptional results.

At HVA, education is not the only point of interest; the school emphasizes the importance of the whole person, nurturing the mental, spiritual and emotional well-being of the students.

As a STEM certified school, HVA prepares students for college and beyond. Incoming freshmen are enrolled in a freshman science course called Integrated STEM during the fall semester. Those who are interested in going further can progress through the STEM certificate program. Nationally certified in 2019 by the National Institute for STEM Education (NISE), it empowers students to become technologically competent, logical and innovative problem solvers and thinkers.

At HVA, knowledge goes beyond academics. Students benefit from the school’s growing music, sports and gymnastics programs. They make lifelong friends by sharing vegetarian meals. During events – such as retreats, weekly workshops, community events, inter-class tournaments, and student-led spiritual programs – they build memories they will never forget.

With its semi-rural setting just an hour from Washington, DC, HVA students can take invaluable trips. Many have the opportunity to explore the Senate and Congress rooms of the United States Capitol, the Library of Congress, and other historic places. To learn more about how HVA educates for eternity, click here.

Saint-Michel Catholic Academy

If you are looking for a Christ-centered, college-preparatory learning community, then Saint-Michel Catholic Academy is the place for you. Exclusively for students in grades 9 to 12, this is a school built on four pillars: service, integrity, intellectual curiosity and courage.

With a focus on academics, the arts and athletics, SMCA has built a balanced framework. Source: Saint-Michel Catholic Academy

“St. Michael’s is committed to being the best school possible – by fulfilling the mission promise to help our students grow in their lives of faith, embrace learning, and give back to the local community and beyond.” school principal Dawn Nichols said.

The school transforms students into well-balanced graduates thanks to its Winter term program and Global Studies Program that have life changing potential. Both are unique academic, cultural, service, travel and language immersion programs.

As part of the winter program, for example, students can choose to attend mini-seminars, do internships, or participate in a travel program that includes exchanges with sister schools, trips to service to solve real world problems in various cultural environments, as well as travel.

St. Michael’s is also building a new university wing, the Advanced Learning Opportunities Center project, which aims to meet the emerging demands of education models that go beyond the classroom and expand the school’s capacity to respond to the need for an immersive and ambitious learning space.

Ultimately, learning at St. Michael’s not only prepares students for academic success, but also facilitates students in the development of 21st century skills and a global mindset, in addition to promoting the character development.

Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy

At Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy (CHCA), students thrive academically, socially and spiritually. This Christ-centered, multi-faith college preparatory academy prepares students for real impact.

American schools

CHCA’s curriculum is designed to challenge students and ensure they are ready for college. Source: Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy

Here, students conduct independent research projects, run small businesses, learn in a teaching kitchen, participate in real-world internships, perform on stage, and earn in athletics. Students learn outside the walls of the classroom during intersession, design and build robots, and spend hundreds of hours at home and abroad. Through it all, they are challenged to grow spiritually and develop resilient faith. Each student’s experience is as unique as they are.

CHCA’s curriculum is designed to challenge students and ensure they are ready for college and beyond. “We have carefully designed our college readiness program – preschool through grade 12 – to foster lifelong passions for learning and to provide thoughtful and effective leadership,” said Randy Brunk, Director of school.

At the CHCA, Athletics and the arts are more than just activities outside the classroom. These are opportunities for students to discover their passion and talent. There is a wide range of top notch sporting facilities and options including football, cross country skiing, volleyball, golf, tennis, swimming and more.

Hands-on learning and real-world application are also essential parts of the International Student Program (ISP) at CHCA. International students receive a tailor-made and personalized experience that promotes academic, cultural and social integration into the school community.

Christian Heritage Academy

the Christian Heritage Academy has one goal: to glorify God by serving Christian parents and their children while providing a high quality Christ-centered educational program. HCA is an evangelical Christian prep school located in southern Johnson County, Kansas for students from Kindergarten to Grade 12.

American schools

HCA believes that education should be about empowering their students to be successful, to be confident and to respect them. Source: Christian Heritage Academy

The Christian school offers an unprecedented opportunity to equip students with a biblical perspective on every subject for a lifetime. HCA passionately believes that education should be about empowering their students to succeed, have confidence and respect the world around them, ready to make a difference in our global society.

The school is committed to providing a quality STEM-based educational program to students. Students benefit from extracurricular learning opportunities such as a Bridge Building Competition, FIRST Robotics, FIRST Technology Challenge (FTC), Scholars’ Bowl, National Science Bowl, Science Olympiad, etc.

Students are immersed in a culture of hard work where excellent academic results are made possible by small class sizes, dedicated teachers and superb facilities. When not focused on their studies, students participate in extracurricular activities such as basketball, cheerleading, volleyball, soccer, and track and field.

As a seventh-year parent shares, “We really appreciate HCA. It has been a blessing for us, we couldn’t be happier.

* Some of the institutions featured in this article are Business Partners of Study International


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Get to know the first president de La Salle, as the University searches for its next https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/get-to-know-the-first-president-de-la-salle-as-the-university-searches-for-its-next/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/get-to-know-the-first-president-de-la-salle-as-the-university-searches-for-its-next/#respond Tue, 03 Aug 2021 22:19:59 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/get-to-know-the-first-president-de-la-salle-as-the-university-searches-for-its-next/ Who was Brother Teliow Fackeldey, FSC? In June, La Salle University installed Tim O’Shaughnessy, ’85, as interim president, on appointment by the University’s Board of Trustees. A national search is underway for the next president of La Salle University, the 30th in the institution’s nearly 160-year history. This seems to be the most appropriate time […]]]>

Who was Brother Teliow Fackeldey, FSC?

In June, La Salle University installed Tim O’Shaughnessy, ’85, as interim president, on appointment by the University’s Board of Trustees. A national search is underway for the next president of La Salle University, the 30th in the institution’s nearly 160-year history.

This seems to be the most appropriate time to reflect on the first President of La Salle — Brother Teliow Fackeldey, FSC.

who was he? What do we know about him?

Well, the University’s presidential medal recognizing exceptional integrity, merit and public service – considered one of La Salle’s highest honors – bears Fr. The name of Teliow. The same goes for a presidential conference room located in College Hall, where a portrait of Fr. Teliow adorns a wall outside the president’s office.

Bro. Teliow maintained a critically important role in the establishment of La Salle College, which received its charter from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in 1863.

Born in Prussia, Br. Teliow arrived in the United States at the age of 21. He worked in Wisconsin and Iowa before deciding to join the Brothers of the Christian Schools. Historical accounts show that he showed great promise as a teacher. It was not long before he was hired for school administration duties – he first ran St. Mary’s School in Detroit in 1852 before moving in 1854 to Philadelphia, where he would run St. . Peter’s.

Bro. Teliow’s experience in the successful management of Christian Brothers schools led the Bishop of Philadelphia James Frederick Wood to contact him regarding an existing gap in Catholic higher education in Philadelphia. Two predecessors of La Salle College had ceased their activities in the city due to the ongoing American Civil War. At the time of Bishop Wood’s meeting with Br. Teliow, Catholic men made up about one in six Philadelphia residents. The market was plentiful for such a higher education institution.

In essence, this recommendation from an informal conversation gave birth to La Salle University.

Following this meeting, Br. Teliow quickly set to work to carry out Bishop Wood’s mission, the same mission on which La Salle was founded: to develop “a college within the city limits of Philadelphia in which the elementary branches are to be taught. of education, as well as modern and ancient sciences and languages.

Image of Brother Teliow Fackeldey, 1863, La Salle University Archives.
Brother Teliow Fackeldey, FSC., 1863,
La Salle University Archives.

Bro. Teliow and the Christian Brothers first laid the foundations of La Salle College by creating what was then called the Lycée des Frères Chrétiens. (Today it is known as La Salle College High School, in Wyndmoor, Pa.) A year later, in 1863, La Salle College was born. The Charter of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania for La Salle College brought to life Bishop Wood’s vision for a Catholic college in Philadelphia. He also brought great visibility to fr. Teliow, who won the admiration of others. In January 1864, less than nine months after La Salle College received its charter, Br. Teliow was gone.

“A talented man, the services of Brother Teliow had been requested by the Society for the Protection of Needy Roman Catholic Children, whose president, L. Silliman Ives, addressed himself directly to the Superior General of the Christian Brothers so that Brother Teliow could be affected. reads a passage from the 1966 book “Conceived in Crisis: A History of La Salle College”. “Ives’ request was granted on December 1, 1863, and La Salle College lost a co-founder and its first president.”

Brother Oliver Daly, FSC, replaced Brother. Teliow in January 1864 and, perhaps most notably, was commissioned to help install La Salle’s first board of directors.

While it was common at the time for the Institute of the Brothers of the Christian Schools to issue reassignments with little notice, the administrative decision led to La Salle’s second shortest presidential term in history. The brevity of Br. Teliow’s presidency follows that of one brother Dominic Luke Doyle, FSC, who took office in the late summer of 1945 and, before the end of the calendar year, was replaced by the 22nd president de La Salle, Brother Gregorian Paul Sprissler, FSC.

So much has changed since La Salle first received his charter from Pennsylvania. For example, La Salle changed campus locations twice before arriving in Northwest Philadelphia and relocating to its current 133-acre campus near 20th and Olney in historic Belfield. And in 2015, the installation of Colleen M. Hanycz, Ph.D., as President of La Salle marked the first woman to hold the University’s most senior administrative position. Just in May, more than 3,100 students celebrated their De La Salle graduation during the University’s debut exercises.

None of this would have been possible without Br. Teliow.

—Christophe A. Vito


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Chief wants Kansas site included in search for anonymous graves https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/chief-wants-kansas-site-included-in-search-for-anonymous-graves/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/chief-wants-kansas-site-included-in-search-for-anonymous-graves/#respond Fri, 23 Jul 2021 16:33:54 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/chief-wants-kansas-site-included-in-search-for-anonymous-graves/ Native American tribe chief fears that a former Kansas residential school could be left out of a federal initiative to determine whether thousands of Native American children were buried in schools across the country in the 1800s and early 1900s. Shawnee Tribe Chief Ben Barnes said federal officials had not indicated whether the Indian Shawnee […]]]>

Native American tribe chief fears that a former Kansas residential school could be left out of a federal initiative to determine whether thousands of Native American children were buried in schools across the country in the 1800s and early 1900s.

Shawnee Tribe Chief Ben Barnes said federal officials had not indicated whether the Indian Shawnee Mission in Fairway, Kansas would be part of an investigation launched last month by US Home Secretary Deb Haaland . Barnes said he and others feared the Kansas school would be overlooked because it was run by the Methodist Church rather than the federal government, as were many other Native children’s residential schools.

Much of the conversation since the announcement of the Federal Indian Residential Schools Initiative has focused on federally run schools, such as the famed Carlisle Indian Reform School in Pennsylvania, which has promoted the idea of erase Native American culture and assimilate Native children into white society. Barnes noted that many boarding schools, including the one in Kansas, operated for decades before the Carlisle School opened in 1879.

“There have been a lot of rumors and innuendo about what they’re going to investigate,” Barnes said. “We are in contact with the federal government and lobbyists to help them make it clear that the Indian mission system did not start with Carlisle.”

A spokesperson for the Home Office said in an email that the agency had only recently started work on the federal program and that no information was yet available on individual locations.

Barnes said making distinctions between federally run schools that forcibly remove children from their families and church run schools that “persuade” families to send their children to school was offensive, because the two guys had the same mission.

Congress contracted Indian agents to work with missionaries to convince Native American families to send their children to church-run schools. They tried to convince families that they would have no future if they stayed with their tribes, who were forced to march to Kansas in the 1800s as part of what became known as the Trail. of Tears, said Barnes.

“It was coercion,” Barnes said. “(Tribal families) were told that if they wanted to fit in, they shouldn’t act so differently, behave and get along. It was seen as the best solution for our future.

When discussing the initiative in June, Haaland acknowledged that the process will be painful and difficult, but said there is a need to address the lasting trauma caused by schools. The American effort came after nearly 1,000 unmarked graves have been discovered at the sites of former residential schools in Canada in recent months.

Bobbie Athon, spokesperson for the Kansas State Historical Society, owner of the mission at Fairway, said the agency had not been contacted by federal officials but would be happy to work with the initiative if we asked him.

Barnes said the Shawnee Tribe, headquartered in Miami, Oklahoma, has a strong working relationship with the Historical Society and the City of Fairway, which oversees the day-to-day operations of the mission. He said it should be the responsibility of the federal government to investigate the mission site.

The Shawnee Indian Methodist Manual Labor School was founded on its present site in 1939 by Thomas Johnson, a Methodist minister to whom Johnson County was later named. Children from many tribes attended and learned the basics of academia, manual arts and agriculture, according to the historical society. At one point, it consisted of 16 buildings on over 2,000 acres, with nearly 200 students a year aged 5 to 23.

Barnes said Johnson, a slave owner, and others forced Native Americans to pay for building materials and to build the school, and tribal families paid up to $ 20 per student to attend. He argues that Johnson got rich outside of school because kids spent most of their time doing manual jobs rather than academics.

Most of the original 2,000 acres belonging to the mission have been developed. At a minimum, the Shawnee Tribe wants the federal government to conduct ground-penetrating radar searches on the remaining 12 acres at the mission site to search for unmarked graves.

But Barnes said he hoped the new focus on boarding schools would prompt national leaders to make resources available to seriously tackle their painful legacy.

“Let’s use this moment not to just bow to the cause of good and good, to really do something,” he said. We want the names of these children. Someone wrote them down somewhere. Who has the record? Where did they go? What more can they do to find out? “

Barnes said part of him is hopeful that no graves are found at the site, but if they are, the tribe would have private conversations about how to honor the children.

“I’m not sure I could take it if we were to find them,” he said. “I don’t know how we could fix it. But I have an obligation to the families, as the leader of the descendants, to demand that we watch.

___

This story has been corrected to reflect the Trail of Tears that happened in the 1800s.


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Civil War veterans to receive headstones in New Baltimore cemeteries – The Voice https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/civil-war-veterans-to-receive-headstones-in-new-baltimore-cemeteries-the-voice/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/civil-war-veterans-to-receive-headstones-in-new-baltimore-cemeteries-the-voice/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 11:03:45 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/civil-war-veterans-to-receive-headstones-in-new-baltimore-cemeteries-the-voice/ About 160 years since the start of the Civil War and over 90 years since their deaths, local Civil War veterans are on the verge of receiving long-awaited cemetery headstones. Three Civil War veterans in two New Baltimore cemeteries are expected to receive headstones to mark their graves, due to the dedication of Amy Shirkey-Withrow, […]]]>

About 160 years since the start of the Civil War and over 90 years since their deaths, local Civil War veterans are on the verge of receiving long-awaited cemetery headstones.

Three Civil War veterans in two New Baltimore cemeteries are expected to receive headstones to mark their graves, due to the dedication of Amy Shirkey-Withrow, a member of the New Baltimore Historical Society.

“It makes me very sad to see someone who was in the military being undercover,” Shirkey-Withrow said.

Shirkey-Withrow assisted with the Company’s gravestone cleanup at Oakwood Cemetery. She also volunteers for Find a Grave, an online list of information on burials and cemeteries largely run by contributors. She learned that Civil War veterans Nelson Carpenter and David Blay did not have gravestones and undertook an extensive search process to obtain markers for them.

This took her through the US Department of Veterans Affairs and Macomb County. Contacting a Macomb County Veterans Services Officer via email, Shirkey-Withrow was directed to the Memorial Products Department of the National Cemetery Administration at the Department of Veterans Affairs. Shirkey-Withrow contacted the Memorial Products department of the National Cemetery Administration at the Department of Veterans Affairs and received information on how to request markers as well as the necessary documents. She also sought and obtained permission from the City of New Baltimore to obtain and place tombstones for Blay and Carpenter.

She sent out the nominations for Blay and Carpenter on May 21.

Through his research, Shirkey-Withrow learned that a third local Civil War veteran needed a gravestone. Robert Morton is buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery. Obtaining this gravestone required cooperation from the church and the Memorial Products Department of the Veterans Department’s National Cemetery Administration, Shirkey-Withrow said. The request for Morton’s gravestone was sent out on June 7.

Shirkey-Withrow said she was recently given the green light for Blay and Carpenter’s headstones, which arrived and, as of July 12, were in the New Baltimore Department of Public Service awaiting installation. Shirkey-Withrow received an email on June 29 stating that Morton’s headstone had been ordered, and she expects it to arrive in four or six weeks.

The National Cemetery Administration’s Memorial Products Services Department will provide the headstones free of charge, Shirkey-Withrow said. She also stated that the New Baltimore DPS has donated the facility to Oakwood Cemetery at no cost, and that Kerry Shuttleworth will be making the facility at St. Mary’s Cemetery as a donation. Dawn Wolschleger, director of the New Baltimore DPS office, said the department will donate the installation of the two headstones at Oakwood Cemetery. St Mary’s Queen of Creation Catholic Church Cemetery Director Rita Mayer said Shuttleworth donated the foundation work for Morton’s Stone.

Shirkey-Withrow said the dates for the installation of the tombstones had not been selected, but she hopes they can be installed in July and wants to hold a groundbreaking ceremony.

Shirkey-Withrow’s research indicates that Carpenter was born December 15, 1841 and died March 31, 1929. He first enlisted in the military in 1861 and was eventually promoted to corporal. Blay was one of the early settlers in Macomb County, a Mason who fought in the Civil War with Company C, 5th Michigan Infantry. He was wounded in combat. In 1881, he and August Maliskey built the Grand Pacific House for Frederick and Emma Losh. He died in 1927 at the age of 94.

Shirkey-Withrow’s research shows that Morton was born in May 1832 and died on January 30, 1922. He first enlisted in the military in 1861, then re-enlisted and was eventually promoted to corporal. He enlisted for the first time on August 13, 1861 in Company A, 9th Michigan Infantry, and was wounded in action in 1862.

The non-profit New Baltimore Historical Society was founded in 1976. The mission of the society is to preserve the historical aspects of the Anchor Bay community for the future, to maintain the Grand Pacific House as a museum with constantly changing exhibits and artifacts; and provide research and historical programs. in the community.

Pictured are members of the New Baltimore Historical Society who volunteered in period dress on July 10: Amy Shirkey-Withrow, Rebecca Rymski, Vince Nestico, Jane Lenaway, Barbara Roddy and Suzanne Vitale.

The Grand Pacific House is located at 51065 Washington St. Society Vice President Vince Nestico said after the Halloween events of October 2020, the museum was closed to the public until July 10. With the help of enthusiastic new members and volunteers, the museum had new exhibits ready when it reopened on July 10.

“We had a lot of work to do, to prepare. Mainly cleaning, rearranging some screens, things like that, ”Nestico said.

Eight volunteers from the company dressed in various costumes welcomed around sixty visitors on July 10, Nestico said.

“One thing our member Amy (Shirkey-Withrow) has put on is a veterans exhibit. We took out many military artefacts, including civil war documents, ”Nestico said.

The exhibit in honor of military personnel features artifacts such as uniforms, medals, meal kits and more from the Civil War, WWI, WWII, and the Korean War .

“Amy has also put together a collection of photos and biographies of all of the New Baltimore soldiers who have been killed in action,” Nestico said.

Grand Pacific House in New Baltimore reopened to the public for the season on July 10, with a new exhibit dedicated to veteran history.

Civil War artifacts include a sword, discharge papers, and a certificate of promotion. A clearance certificate is for William Dubay, whose gravestone at Oakwood Cemetery was recently cleaned. Nestico said Dubay was a prisoner of war but was able to return home and lived almost to 100 years old. Dubay was born on April 2, 1844 and died in March 1944.

The museum will be open from noon to 2 p.m. on Saturday, but may close and reopen for special Halloween events in October. Nestico predicted that the museum would generally remain open on Saturdays until around Christmas. The entrance fee to the museum is a donation.

“We will once again be holding our Christmas Open House for the first time since before COVID,” Nestico said, adding that a second potential Christmas-related event is also under discussion.

Nicole Tuttle is a freelance journalist for MediaNews Group.


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