Catholic historical society – Catholic Record Society http://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/ Thu, 17 Jun 2021 09:41:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Catholic historical society – Catholic Record Society http://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/ 32 32 There are plenty of events happening in the Southwest to fill your week ahead | The standard https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/there-are-plenty-of-events-happening-in-the-southwest-to-fill-your-week-ahead-the-standard/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/there-are-plenty-of-events-happening-in-the-southwest-to-fill-your-week-ahead-the-standard/#respond Thu, 17 Jun 2021 04:39:00 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/there-are-plenty-of-events-happening-in-the-southwest-to-fill-your-week-ahead-the-standard/ news, breaking news, whatson, Warrnambool, southwest Victoria, Port Fairy, concerts, live music, markets WORKSHOP: Rhea Dempsey, educator, counselor, midwife and author, will be in Warrnambool this weekend. On Saturday, she will lead a birth workshop, Working with the dynamics of pain during labor, from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Visit site.corsizio.com/c/609fa62caf525f0f322d74ac to reserve. On Sunday, […]]]>


news, breaking news, whatson, Warrnambool, southwest Victoria, Port Fairy, concerts, live music, markets

WORKSHOP: Rhea Dempsey, educator, counselor, midwife and author, will be in Warrnambool this weekend. On Saturday, she will lead a birth workshop, Working with the dynamics of pain during labor, from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Visit site.corsizio.com/c/609fa62caf525f0f322d74ac to reserve. On Sunday, Rhea will launch her second book Beyond the Birth Plan at Collins Booksellers Warrnambool from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. To book, go to facebook.com/events/4147339055321187 THEATER LAB: Do you have an idea for a play but it stays in your head? hidden in a drawer? but the script is finished – You have a half in one place – You need the Warrnambool Theater Lab to write, work and act! The Lab is a safe space where writers can share plays, see them performed, work on the floor, collect feedback, and plan for the stage. Come to the Warrnambool Theater Lab to unleash your creativity. Saturday June 19, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Mozart Hall, 2 Gilles St, Warrnambool. Free event – RSPV: william.king@education.vic.gov.au. SKETCHBOOKING EXHIBITION: “Sketchbooking” is where history meets art, recording a visual diary of inspiring people and events in our lives. This exhibition at Gateway Plaza features local and less local artwork combining creative expression and text to tell stories. Hope this inspires you to record your own artistic life stories. June 19 to July 4 – free event. BREAKFAST: For men who want to find a place to chat, look no further than the Grab Life by the Balls community which meets at Lake Pertobe at 7:30 am every Friday. WARRNAMBOOL TALE FESTIVAL: The city’s first storytelling festival kicks off this weekend with a special launch event at the Lighthouse Theater. Starring songwriter and storyteller Shane Howard, the launch will present a preview of what the festival program has to offer. See the full schedule here: Warrnambool Storytelling Festival kicks off at Lighthouse Theater this Sunday GOD’S STORY, MY STORY, OUR STORY: This special interactive church service invites participants to engage in small groups and reflect on the stories scriptures that shape faith; stories that created a church and personal faith stories. Over morning tea, author Philip Liebelt will launch his new New Testament first-person storybook, “The Innkeeper of Jericho”. Sunday June 20, 10 a.m. at Warrnambool Uniting Church. MARKET: Fresh Market Warrnambool will operate as an essential farmer’s market on Sunday June 20 at Lake Pertobe. It will be a small market operating with purchasing capacity and exit from 8:30 am. TELL US A STORY: This is an oral history event. Warrnambool and District Historical Society collects and preserves historical society memorabilia from the past to share with future generations. You are welcome to come and tell us an interesting local story. Do you have a particular memory of a particular person, place or event from the 1940s to the 1990s? The company would like to save your story for inclusion in their files. Tuesday June 22, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at HeritageWorks, 2 rue Gilles Warrnambool. OUR WARRNAMBOOL: How do research, education and community shape our city? Please join renowned speakers, Hannah Beks (Rural Health), Dr Trish Corbett (Maremma Dogs on Middle Island) Mel Steffensen (Curator of Indigenous Languages) and Dr John Sherwood (Life and Environmental Sciences) as you will tell their personal stories of how their research and education was influenced and impacted the city we live in. Wednesday 23 June, 5.30 p.m. Free event – register through eventbrite.com. REFUGEE WEEK: Celebrate Refugee Week 2021 at the St Joseph Catholic Church Hall on Wednesday June 23 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Soup, bread and live music during the day. Entry by donation. All proceeds go to Friends of Refugees. Reservations required due to COVID. Book 0438 415 661. DEATH CAFE: The Warrnambool and District Community Hospice invites you to its free Death Cafe event to discuss death, death and compassionate end-of-life care. Wednesday June 23 from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. online. STORY TIME: Story time in the Warrnambool Library. This is a FREE 30-45 minute program with specially selected books, stories and song for ages 3 to 6 and is followed by a fun craft activity. Story time helps develop: love of books, pre-reading skills and desire to read, listening and speaking skills, cooperative behavior, imagination and creativity. Wednesday June 23 & 30, 11 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Thursday June 24 & July 1, 11am – 11:45 am RHYMETIME: Rhymetime is a FREE program designed for children aged 6 months to 3 years and their caregivers. It involves singing nursery rhymes, songs, and playing games. This is an interactive program and adult participation is required to get the most out of it. Come on, ready to clap your hands, wiggle your fingers, and have some fun! As the number of people allowed is limited, reservations are essential for anyone over 12 months old. Wednesday June 23 & 30, 2:30 p.m. – 3 p.m. Fridays June 25 & July 2, 10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. FILM FEST: Banff Mountain Film Festival 2021 will be screened at Capitol Cinemas in Warrnambool. From 19h. For more details, visit www.banffaustralia.com.au. Have you signed up for The Standard’s daily newsletter and the latest email news? You can sign up below and make sure you’re up to date with all that is happening in the Southwest.

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In memoriam: Funeral notice, June 16, 2021 | Obituary https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/in-memoriam-funeral-notice-june-16-2021-obituary/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/in-memoriam-funeral-notice-june-16-2021-obituary/#respond Wed, 16 Jun 2021 08:30:06 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/in-memoriam-funeral-notice-june-16-2021-obituary/ OLSRUD, Lois Christine Died June 2, 2021. She was born September 21, 1930 to Reverend Oscar and Marguerite Olsrud in Havre, Montana. She grew up in Lutheran parsonages in Montana, Washington, and North Dakota. She graduated from high school in Beach, North Dakota, and received her undergraduate degree from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota, after which […]]]>







OLSRUD, Lois Christine

Died June 2, 2021. She was born September 21, 1930 to Reverend Oscar and Marguerite Olsrud in Havre, Montana. She grew up in Lutheran parsonages in Montana, Washington, and North Dakota. She graduated from high school in Beach, North Dakota, and received her undergraduate degree from Concordia College, Moorhead, Minnesota, after which she taught English and was a school librarian at Princeton, Minnesota, Havre and Great Falls, Montana. She continued her education at Indiana University with a master’s degree in library science. She arrived at the University of Arizona in 1966 as a Humanities Reference Librarian where she worked until her retirement in 1996. Lois joined Our Savior’s Lutheran Church after arriving in Tucson and has served on many committees. After retiring from the AU, she volunteered at the church office and sang with the choir choir on tours in Europe, Scandinavia, East Germany, the Baltic States. , Mexico and Canada. She has also made trips to Cuba, Puerto Rico, Colombia, Egypt, Jordan, Turkey and Greece.

Lois was a member of the American Library Association, Delta Kappa Gamma, Norwegians Worldwide, University of Arizona Retirees Association, Norwegian-American Historical Society, and was a staunch fan of UA sports.

She was predeceased by her parents and brothers, Harold, David and John Olsrud. She leaves her sisters, Marilyn (Curt) Bah and Rhoda MacKenzie; nieces, Kristen Olsrud, Kimberly Cook, Constance Sachs, Lisa Hooper and Maria Olsrud and nephews, Erik Olsrud, John Scott Olsrud, David MacKenzie, Matthew MacKenzie and Wilson Olsrud as well as great nieces and nephews.

A memorial service will be held on Saturday June 26, 2021 at 10:00 am at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1200 N. Campbell Avenue. Memorial donations can be made in his memory to Our Savior’s Lutheran Church or to support the Lois C. Olsrud Distinguished Librarian Endowment of the University of Arizona Libraries. Donations can be made online at give.uafoundation.org or by check made payable to the University of Arizona Foundation / UA Libraries and sent to PO Box 210109, Tucson, AZ 85721-0109. Arrangements by AVENIDAS CREMATION AND BURIAL.



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The Musical Mysteries of Josquin https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-musical-mysteries-of-josquin/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-musical-mysteries-of-josquin/#respond Mon, 14 Jun 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/the-musical-mysteries-of-josquin/ Singer and composer Josquin Desprez has lived through his time like a shy ghost, glimpsed here and there in the splendor of the Renaissance. He is believed to have been born around 1450 in present-day western Belgium, the son of a policeman who was previously imprisoned for excessive use of force. In 1466, a boy […]]]>


Singer and composer Josquin Desprez has lived through his time like a shy ghost, glimpsed here and there in the splendor of the Renaissance. He is believed to have been born around 1450 in present-day western Belgium, the son of a policeman who was previously imprisoned for excessive use of force. In 1466, a boy named Gossequin made a passage as an altar boy in the city of Cambrai. A decade later, the singer Jusquinus de Pratis appears at the court of René d’Anjou, in Aix. In the eighties, in Milan, Judocus Despres was in the service of the house of Sforza, which also employed Leonardo da Vinci. At the end of the decade, judo. de Prez joined the Vatican musical team, remaining there during the reign of Alexander VI, from the House of Borgia. The name Josquin can be seen engraved on a wall of the Sistine Chapel. In 1503, Maestro Juschino took up a post in Ferrara, singing in the presence of Lucrezia Borgia. Shortly after, Josse des Prez retired to Condé-sur-l’Escaut, near his alleged birthplace, serving as provost of the local church. He died there on August 27, 1521. His tomb was destroyed during the French Revolution.

Despite the obscurity of his existence, Josquin achieved a lasting fame of a genre no previous composer had known. In 1502 the Venetian printer Ottaviano Petrucci, the main pioneer of movable-type music publishing, published a volume of sacred motets, with the setting to music for four voices of “Ave Maria.” . . virgo serena ”(“ Hail Mary… serene virgin ”) at its head. The play must have cast a spell, and the beginning shows why. The highest voice, the superius, sings a graceful ascending and descending phrase: GCCDE C. Each of the low voices presents the pattern in turn. After arriving in bass, the superius again enters high C, forming an octave pillar. A second phrase unfolds the same, then a third, with voices shifted so that only two move together at a time. Eventually, the pattern changes, the texture thickens and the descending order of the vocal inputs is reversed. About a minute later, the four voices unite to form a sparkling tone in C major. The whole opening gives the illusion of breadth and depth, as if lamps had been lit in a vaulted room. Music becomes a space in which we walk with wonder.

Interest in Josquin was strong enough for Petrucci to publish three volumes of the composer’s masses, arrangements of five sections of the Roman mass (Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Agnus Dei). Posthumously, the flow of publications only increased, to the point where one observer said wryly: “Now that Josquin is dead, he publishes more works than when he was still alive.” Extravagant claims have been made. Humanist Cosimo Bartoli described Josquin as the Michelangelo of music; Martin Luther called him “the master of notes”. During the following centuries, performances of his works practically ceased, but his name remained an element to be warded off. In 1782, historian Charles Burney declared that Josquin had achieved “universal monarchy and domination over the affections and passions of the musical part of humanity.” For August Wilhelm Ambros, in 1868, he was the first composer in history “who conveys an impression of genius”. In the 20th century, the early music movement revived Josquin’s scores, and the revival continued five hundred years after his death. The Tallis Scholars, the best known of Renaissance vocal groups, recently completed a recorded survey of eighteen masses attributed to Josquin. Bands such as Stile Antico, Cappella Pratensis, Blue Heron and the Huelgas Ensemble participate in a Josquin festival in Antwerp in August. Ave Maria is a staple of choirs around the world.

With Josquin began the cult of the great composer, a state of mind that has left a clearly ambiguous imprint on the culture of classical music. And his rise to superhero status has resulted in a curious paradox. Although commentators across five centuries have agreed on Josquin’s preeminence, his works can easily be mistaken for those of other gifted contemporaries. Two anecdotes from the beginning of the 16th century illustrate what one might call Josquin’s mirage, where the brilliance of his name distorts musical perceptions. Baldassare Castiglione, in his treatise “The Courtier’s Book” (1528), noted the composer’s snobbish appeal in aristocratic settings: “When a motet was sung in the presence of the Duchess, it pleased no one and was considered worthless, until it was known that it had been composed by Josquin Desprez. The opposite fate befell a play by Adrian Willaert, one of Josquin’s most accomplished successors. When Willaert first came to Rome, he discovered that the papal choir was singing one of their motets, under the impression that it was by Josquin. When Willaert corrected the error, the singers lost interest in the work. Such stories help explain why attributions to Josquin proliferated after his death: putting his name on a sheet music was guaranteed to generate interest. The same syndrome has long haunted Renaissance art, where the emphasis on the singular profile of canonical artists led to heated debates over authenticity and a thriving counterfeit market.

Over three hundred coins have been attributed to Josquin at one time or another. In recent decades, musicologists have removed questionable items from the catalog. This spring, I followed the work of two prominent Josquin authorities, Joshua Rifkin and Jesse Rodin, as they put together a considerably pruned list of probable Josquin pieces – one hundred and three in all. Some researchers fear that the attribution process has got out of hand; the half-joking fear is that Josquin will eventually disappear almost completely, like the Cheshire cat. Thanks to the pandemic phenomenon of the Zoom seminar, I was able to attend some of the deliberations, which kept raising bigger philosophical questions: how does an aura of infallibility come to surround a figure like Josquin? What becomes of the music that sinks into anonymity, when “The Man with the Golden Helmet” seems to come out of Rembrandt’s canon?

There is nothing wrong with this aura: Josquin was an astonishing composer, whose contrapuntal dazzles can make Bach clumsy. But he lived in a completely amazing community of creative artists. To explore Renaissance choral music is to enter an intimidating forest of names: Dunstable, Power, Binchois, Dufay, Busnois, Ockeghem, Regis, Faugues, Compère, Weerbeke, Agricola, de Orto, Obrecht, Isaac, de la Rue, Mouton, Brumel, Févin, Richafort, Ghiselin, Gombert, Pipelare, Martini, Clemens non Papa, Morales, Willaert, Lassus, Palestrina. Each of them wrote music worth hearing. The period bears witness to the emergence of composition as an art: Josquin became the patron of an essentially new profession which struggled to acquire the level of recognition long accorded to painters and poets. Distinct personalities materialize in the historical haze. We hear the sound of self, singing to a kind of freedom.

The term “composer” did not begin to generalize until the end of the 15th century. The practice of naming the authors of musical works was still in vogue. Documents of the time generally call Josquin a cantor, or singer. Yet his rise to fame helped bring about a change in status. In 1502, a courtier of Ercole I, the Duke of Ferrara, wrote a letter evaluating candidates for a musical nomination. One of them, Heinrich Isaac, was “easy going,” said the courtier; another, Josquin, “composes when he wants, and not when we want”. Also, Josquin asked for two hundred ducats, Isaac much less. Ercole, I hired Josquin.

Composers were a new phenomenon because written music itself was a relatively recent innovation in the long history of the arts. The earliest examples of fully decipherable staff notation, from the beginning of the 11th century, record Gregorian chant; sacred music for several voices was written in Notre-Dame, in Paris, in the 12th and 13th centuries. Troubadours, Finders, and other poet-composers have produced a well-loved body of songs, although the lyrics tend to receive more attention than the notes. The most formidable figure of the time was Guillaume de Machaut, who lived from around 1300 to 1377. Celebrated primarily for his courtly sung love poems, Machaut also wrote two dozen motets and the first cycle of masses for which a composer is known. Such large-scale elaborations on canonical texts sustained careers in the following century, as popes, princes, and other potentates sought to flesh out courtly ceremonies with splendid sounds. The history of written music is inextricably intertwined with worldly power structures, even though composers held a low place in the hierarchy.

Josquin embodies the art of polyphony: the interweaving of several voices according to strict contrapuntal rules. The main mandate was to control dissonance, a term that was understood differently in medieval times and the Renaissance than it is today. It indicated not only discordant combinations of tones, but also problematic relationships between notes. The octave, the fifth and sometimes the fourth were considered “perfect” consonances; thirds and sixths were “imperfect”; other intervals fall under the category of “dissonant”. A distrust of third parties is part of the reason medieval music can sound austere and strange to modern ears. Thirds are at the heart of tonal harmony, defining major and minor tones. At the beginning of the 15th century, English composers, led by John Dunstable, began to use thirds in abundance. Their lush, chord-rich sound has come to be known as the “English Face”, surprising and delighting listeners across the continent. English sources are also the first to name composers in large numbers.

“And that’s where the wealth comes from, my son.”
Cartoon by Robert Leighton

Geopolitics played a role in what happened next. King Henry V of England, who may have tried his hand at composition, won at Azincourt in 1415 and quickly recaptured northern France. The English officials brought with them their favorite choristers; Dunstable obviously served John of Lancaster, brother of Henry V and military commander. Thanks to Joan of Arc, England’s possessions quickly dwindled, but not before her music infiltrated northern France and Belgian lands. Coincidence or not, this region gave birth to the next great wave of musical activity. A large number of 15th and early 16th century composers, including Josquin, belonged to what is now called the Franco-Flemish School.

At the head of the procession was Guillaume Dufay (circa 1397-1474), who brought the elegance of dance to exalted masses and street songs. His motet “Nuper rosarum flores” was written for the consecration of Florence Cathedral in 1436, its majestic sounds echoing against Filippo Brunelleschi’s octagonal dome. Other composers of the mid and late 15th century broadened the range of possibilities. Antoine Busnois specializes in a lucid game of patterns; Johannes Ockeghem in opulent and unpredictable designs; Johannes Regis in complex structures that bring together the narrative energy of the calculated addition and subtraction of voices. (Josquin may have based his setting to music of “Ave Maria” on Regis’ motet of the same name.).



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Anne S DeAngelo, 89 years old | Free Greenwich Press https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/anne-s-deangelo-89-years-old-free-greenwich-press/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/anne-s-deangelo-89-years-old-free-greenwich-press/#respond Sat, 12 Jun 2021 20:20:48 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/anne-s-deangelo-89-years-old-free-greenwich-press/ Beloved nurse, daughter, wife, mother and grandmother Anne Dolores Salvatore DeAngelo passed away on June 8, 2021 at the age of 89 in Greenwich Hospital with her family by her side. Her family celebrates her dynamism and the joy she has brought to everyone she has met. Born in Greenwich on August 12, 1931 to […]]]>


Beloved nurse, daughter, wife, mother and grandmother Anne Dolores Salvatore DeAngelo passed away on June 8, 2021 at the age of 89 in Greenwich Hospital with her family by her side.

Her family celebrates her dynamism and the joy she has brought to everyone she has met.

Born in Greenwich on August 12, 1931 to Mary (Piccirillo) and Bert Ernest Salvatore, Anne loved her older brother, Bert Jr., and his extended family. In Greenwich High School, she was captain of the women’s basketball team and avid field hockey player, graduating in 1949. She attended St. Francis Hospital School of Nursing in Hartford, Connecticut, and has graduated as class president in 1952.

She and her four roommates remained staunch friends, reuniting until they were 80 years old.

Anne met her husband, Salvatore DeAngelo, in Bruce Park after a baseball game. They were married at St. Mary’s Church in Greenwich in 1956 and raised their three children. She was predeceased by her parents and brother. She is survived by her husband of 64 years, her children: Bob (Jan), Don (Carolyn) and Dina, and five grandchildren: Annie, Julia and Scott DeAngelo; Béla and Inés Jankovich-Besan, whom she really adored. Pictures of her children and grandchildren covered her walls and table tops.

She had a deep and sincere devotion to her Catholic faith. She and Sal were founding members of St. Agnes Church. Not a day goes by without Anne asking the Blessed Virgin Mary, the guardian angels and Saint Jude to watch over her family.

From the early days of bandaging her pet dog and teddy bear, nursing has been Anne’s greatest passion and calling. During her 53 years as a Registered Nurse she was Head Nurse in the 5 East Medico-Surgical Unit at Greenwich Hospital, then in Greenwich Gynecology. She has helped countless couples from conception to birth. Almost everywhere Anne went, women expressed their gratitude for everything she had helped them during their pregnancy. “Until her last breath, Anne loved being a nurse and taking care of others.

Anne was active in the community and enjoyed volunteering in the greenhouse at the Greenwich Botanical Center from her retirement until less than two weeks before her death. She was a long-time volunteer at the Bruce Museum store. She was also a member of the Greenwich Women’s Club, Friends of Greenwich Point, YWCA, Greenwich Audubon Center, Greenwich Historical Society and Bruce Women’s 18-hole golf club. She helped out with her Cub Scout and Girl Scout troops. Anne loved the outdoors, especially the city beaches, from getting on the Island Beach boat for a swim as a young girl, and then cherishing the daily walks and walks at Tod’s Point.

She enjoyed welcoming people of all ages into her home, whether it was for planned parties or spontaneous visits. Andrea Bocelli’s music, ABBA and the Titanic soundtrack were favorites to play while cooking or dancing with her grandchildren. A dedicated gardener, her family and friends will think of her lovingly whenever they smell lily of the valley or eat green beans and cucumbers from the garden. A firm believer that “you are not old until you are 90 years old,”
Anne’s age matched her youthful spirit throughout her life. We love you more!

In lieu of flowers, those who wish can make a contribution to the Greenwich Botanical Center, PO Box 1600, Cos Cob, CT 06807.

Private funeral arrangements are managed by Castiglione Funeral Home, Inc. in Greenwich. A celebration of Anne’s life will be scheduled for later this summer.



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Time marking | Maitland-Newcastle Catholic News https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/time-marking-maitland-newcastle-catholic-news/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/time-marking-maitland-newcastle-catholic-news/#respond Fri, 11 Jun 2021 02:59:18 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/time-marking-maitland-newcastle-catholic-news/ The portraits of Archibald, the embroidered silk garments, the glass rosary beads, and the wooden cabinets filled with leather-bound editions that line the hallways of Cathedral House are as beautiful as important markers of time. These collections of yesteryear not only preserve the past; they also informthe future. Archives provide a completely impartial view of […]]]>


The portraits of Archibald, the embroidered silk garments, the glass rosary beads, and the wooden cabinets filled with leather-bound editions that line the hallways of Cathedral House are as beautiful as important markers of time.

These collections of yesteryear not only preserve the past; they also inform
the future. Archives provide a completely impartial view of social, cultural and
professional history of an institution. They are a collection of pure primary records of the events at the time they occurred.

The collections of the church are of great importance and canon law prescribes that each diocese must keep archives: “In each curia, diocesan archives must be established in a safe place where documents and writings concerning to both spiritual and temporal affairs of the diocese. correctly classified. (Canon 486)

The scope of the Church’s activities is wide, ranging from education and childcare to
social services, alongside the pastoral action carried out on a daily basis. The archives are the diocesan repository that provides access to this precious history, in particular the when and how of decision-making.

The archives at Cathedral House and in the parishes record events of importance to individuals and the community. Sacramental registers record milestones in a person’s religious life, and bulletins and bulletins record weekly parish activities. Large-scale events such as an Episcopal Congress and World Youth Day are recorded through official documentation, programs and memorabilia.

By recording the past, the records show the evolving nature of the Church. Part of
it is in the media that the Church attracts. Tracking what the Church chooses to highlight and advertise in the pages of its publications, from the Almanac of the Diocese of Maitland to The Newcastle and Maitland Catholic Sentinel and Aurora reflects attitude changes not only of the Church but of society in general.

Objects in the archives can visually show the evolving nature of the Church,
in particular concerning before and after Vatican II. Architectural plans and photographs show changes in the design and decoration of churches. The clothes, in particular the chasubles, testify to the liturgical renewal of Vatican II by removing the most decorative elements and replacing them with a simpler “noble beauty” (SC 124).

Advances online have improved the way we save and share our archives, but they have not changed the fundamentals of how we archive. Electronic registers allow the inclusion of an image of the object and a greater ability to track the movement of objects. The information entered for each item is crucial to establishing provenance and adds historical and cultural value.

Advances in online environments have also dramatically improved accessibility
to the archives. Many institutions may have archives with which they would like to share
the public, but due to space limitations, they are not able to offer access through a
permanent or temporary exhibition. The use of digital galleries allows archives to be preserved and widely shared in a dynamic way. The Diocese of Maitland-Newcastle does not have this feature, but it is something the Archives and Research team is aiming for.

The archives of the diocese date back to the mid-1800s with our first correspondence from Bishop Murray. Some of my favorite items are the collection of rosaries that we hold. The variety of materials, styles and cases in which they are provided make this a wonderful mini collection. I also marvel at the embroidery and lace on the clothes we have in the archives. These are wonderful examples of the craftsmanship found in this ancient art form.

Also of note are the oil paintings of Bishops Murray, Dwyer, Gleeson and Toohey, which hang in Cathedral House. Last year we received a request from Art
Gallery of NSW for more information on portraits in our collection that may have
been candidates for the Archibald Prize. While researching this request, we discovered that Bishop Gleeson’s portrait was a 1949 Archibald Prize finalist.

Each month my colleagues and I organize a small exhibit of items from the archives and make them available to the public in our diocesan offices on Hunter Street. As we carefully select each item, I often wonder if the Archives and Research team is still around 100 years from now, what would they choose for
showcase for this period? Of course, as a society we sometimes fail to realize the
value of an object or event until we are immersed in the moment. It is my absolute honor to ensure milestones and cultural objects, ranging from apparently
insignificant (now) to the extraordinary, are preserved for future generations. You never know, one of our students featured in Aurora could become the
next pope. How wonderful it would be to think about the documentation of their
experience in our diocese and reflect on how this shaped their journey to the Vatican.


Karen Stitt is Team Leader, Archives and Research in the Diocese of Maitland-
Newcastle.

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Community calendar | Wadena Pioneer Journal https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/community-calendar-wadena-pioneer-journal/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/community-calendar-wadena-pioneer-journal/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 17:26:54 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/community-calendar-wadena-pioneer-journal/ Grab your sketchbook and join author and illustrator Jason Walz online as he talks about making comics at 6 p.m. Register for the free event on form.gle/GNfL6MhZAW532Ap18. The Grand Jubilee Parade in June starts at 7 p.m. Garage sales throughout the city from June 10 to 12. Friday 11 June Breakfast in town and in […]]]>


  • Grab your sketchbook and join author and illustrator Jason Walz online as he talks about making comics at 6 p.m. Register for the free event on form.gle/GNfL6MhZAW532Ap18.
  • The Grand Jubilee Parade in June starts at 7 p.m.
  • Garage sales throughout the city from June 10 to 12.

Friday 11 June

  • Breakfast in town and in the country at Burlington Northern Park from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m.
  • Hoot & Toot from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. in the Super One parking lot. Come see the fire trucks, police cars and ambulances.
  • Fireworks at the Wadena County Fairgrounds at dusk.
  • Wadena Farmers Market from 2 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Wesley Lawn across from Tri-County Health Care.
  • Learn about the history of New York Mills on a walking tour with the Otter Tail County Historical Society at 5:00 PM. The tour costs $ 6 per person; meet at the Cultural Center. Below is a free reception for the Reflection finalists and regional artists of “The Happiness Project” at 6pm.

saturday 12 june

  • The Family Fun Day at Sunnybrook Park includes youth breakfast from 9 am to 10 am; fishing tournament from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. and a hot dog lunch at 12:30 p.m.
  • Tune in to the 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wellness Scavenger Hunt at Sunnybrook Park with prizes along the way and prizes for two winning teams. Teams of two cost $ 60; Sign up online.
  • Ronald McDonald House of New York Mills Charity motorcycle ride starts at VFW on Hwy 10 at noon.
  • Finalists of the great American debate “What is more important: winning or obeying the rules?” At the Cultural Center at 7 p.m. Tickets are $ 12 in advance and $ 15 at the door, students are $ 5.

Monday June 14

Flag Layout Ceremony at Wadena Veterans Park, just off Highway 10 East, at 7:00 p.m. Bring your own chairs and learn about the history of the flag as well as demonstrations of flag folding and proper layout.

Wednesday June 16

  • Wadena Senior Center Birthday Party at 2:30 p.m.
  • Take an introductory family mindfulness and meditation class with Staples-Motley Schools Wednesdays at 6 p.m. in high school. Sessions cost $ 10 each or $ 15 for a family and will cover mindfulness in breathing, walking, stress, sitting, anxiety, cooking, parenting and more. Registration is on the school website.

Thursday June 17th

Free frozen meals for seniors 60+ from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. to Lakewood Health System (main campus near the farmer’s market), 401 Prairie Ave NE, Staples.

Permanent dates

  • Cards and Farkel from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Thursday at Wadena Senior Center. Closed from Friday to Sunday. Call (218) 631-4077 for more information.
  • The Celebrate Recovery program will be held at Verndale Family Life Church, 402 Clark Dr. NE, from 6 to 8 p.m. every Sunday. For more information, please call (218) 445-5568.
  • Enjoy story time with the Wadena City Library on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at the library. A recording will also be shared on the the library’s Facebook page.
  • Wadena Open Alcoholics Anonymous meetings at 7 p.m. Wednesday and Sunday at 10 a.m. at 421 NW 4th St, Wadena.
  • Life After Loss group for parents facing the loss of a child on Tuesdays at 7 p.m. on Zoom with Wellness in the Woods. Join us by clicking on the VSPN logo on www.mnwitw.org/vpsn.
  • Free community meal, drive-in style, every last Thursday of the month from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Sainte-Anne Catholic Church in Wadena.
  • Wadena Area Food Shelf open by appointment on Mondays and Thursdays. Call 218-631-7605. Located at 205 Aldrich Ave SE, Wadena.
  • Verndale Area Food Shelf is open 9 am to 12:30 pm every Thursday; and 5 pm to 7 pm every first Thursday at 402 NE Clark Dr. Contact manager Tillman Phagan at 218-445-5508.



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Rivka Galchen’s historical novel satirizes moral panic https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/rivka-galchens-historical-novel-satirizes-moral-panic/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/rivka-galchens-historical-novel-satirizes-moral-panic/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 01:00:44 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/rivka-galchens-historical-novel-satirizes-moral-panic/ EVERYONE KNOWS YOUR MOTHER IS A WITCH By Rivka Galchen Witch hunts have made a comeback in recent years. Or at least, the use by politicians of the term “witch hunt” a. Tweeted 84 times by former President Trump during the Mueller investigation alone, the term has now been stripped of any real meaning, having […]]]>


EVERYONE KNOWS YOUR MOTHER IS A WITCH
By Rivka Galchen

Witch hunts have made a comeback in recent years. Or at least, the use by politicians of the term “witch hunt” a. Tweeted 84 times by former President Trump during the Mueller investigation alone, the term has now been stripped of any real meaning, having more to do with accusations of delegitimization than an investigation into the occult. Between that and the Etsy products bearing phrases like WE ARE THE GRANDSONS OF WITCHES YOU CANNOT BURN, it seems like everyone these days can relate to people accused of witchcraft.

But of course, there was a time when there were literal witch hunts, and these rocked society in the most serious ways. In North America, we are most familiar with the Salem Witch Trials of 1692, which made northeastern Massachusetts a popular and spooky tourist destination. But between 1625 and 1631, under the Catholic Prince-Bishopric of Würzburg, the Holy Roman Empire saw one of the largest mass trials in European history, with around 900 people executed in the Würzburg witch trials.

“Everyone knows your mother is a witch”, Rivka Galchen’s second novel after her acclaimed 2008 debut, “Atmospheric Disturbances”, takes us to the beginning of the 17th century in the German city of Leonberg, where everyone knows everyone and where rumors of witchcraft abound. The city is on edge as witch hunts gain popularity throughout the Holy Roman Empire, just as the Thirty Years’ War is about to begin.

One Tuesday in May 1615, Katharina Kepler – an illiterate widow known for being a strangely independent city dweller and for concocting strange herbal remedies – knocked on her door. Summoned to the governor’s residence, she is accused of being a witch, and more precisely of having poisoned the wine of a woman named Ursula Reinbold. Katharina tells the reader that Ursula “has no children, looks like a nice werewolf” and that the odds of an acquittal are stacked against her. His only allies are his children and his neighbor, legal guardian and scribe, Simon – an isolated widower with his own secrets, who develops a “solid and practical communion” with the protagonist. The story is told from the alternate perspectives of Katharina (speaking to Simon), Simon (explaining his relationship with Katharina, in case “someone asks me about my motives or my acquaintances”) and the people of the city related to the case, testifying before the search. Most of them fear Katharina and claim to have always known that she wasn’t up to anything good.

Katharina Sections tell a very funny and witty tale of a society falling apart due to moral panic, where a simple accusation can lead to execution. Through her interactions with her children and her thoughts on the townspeople – in her head, she calls the governor “the fake unicorn” and Ursula’s brother “the cabbage” – she becomes an example of what can happen. when a strong-minded woman renounces tradition. The testimonies state the city’s suspicions: that Katharina is like a man in her travels, that she dresses in dark colors, that her gaze can cause a stabbing pain in her leg, that she has ridden a goat up to death and made the other animals sick, among other general eccentricities.

Galchen skillfully weaves a story told from multiple angles, showing how easy it is for a crowd mentality to settle into a climate of fear and ignorance when a woman simply exists outside the norm. But in the novel’s sharpest, most humorous moments, there is a deep underlying sadness for an elderly woman who reckons with the loss of her life. Katharina’s fictional story reminds us of the thousands of real lives of men, women and children who have been lost due to absurd cultural anxiety.



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Avon’s Original Aunt Teak and Uncle Junque Celebrate 50 Years: Short Shots of Avon, Avon Lake and North Ridgeville https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/avons-original-aunt-teak-and-uncle-junque-celebrate-50-years-short-shots-of-avon-avon-lake-and-north-ridgeville/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/avons-original-aunt-teak-and-uncle-junque-celebrate-50-years-short-shots-of-avon-avon-lake-and-north-ridgeville/#respond Sun, 06 Jun 2021 13:45:12 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/avons-original-aunt-teak-and-uncle-junque-celebrate-50-years-short-shots-of-avon-avon-lake-and-north-ridgeville/ AVON, Ohio – Residents of New Avon can learn a lot from longtime Avon resident Lois Shinko. The 83-year-old has witnessed many changes in the city, but she still appreciates how the community has flourished. “There are a lot of good companies, with a mix of old and new; beautiful new houses; new schools; wonderful […]]]>


AVON, Ohio – Residents of New Avon can learn a lot from longtime Avon resident Lois Shinko. The 83-year-old has witnessed many changes in the city, but she still appreciates how the community has flourished.

“There are a lot of good companies, with a mix of old and new; beautiful new houses; new schools; wonderful playgrounds, ”she said.

She and her husband, Bob, own the Country Store in Avon, 2536 Stoney Ridge Road. The couple have worked tirelessly for over 50 years to preserve Avon’s rich heritage.

“I’ve always had an interest in retail all my life,” Lois said. “I loved going to the antique sales / auctions with Bob, and we even started selling antiques in our garage.

“An opportunity arose in the early 1970s to purchase my great-great-aunt Emma Weiler’s 1890s store. Also, next door was a hat shop that once belonged to my great cousin May Webber. I was very happy to open my first antique store / country store called Shinko’s.

According to Lois, in the 1890s the store sold haberdashery, tableware, hats, and more. The then “Old French Creek Settlement” had a sawmill, a grain mill, a car shop, a blacksmith’s shop, a hotel, a saloon, a stagecoach stop and several stores.

Lois and Bob love antiques and share this passion. The couple, married for 58 years, are Aunt Teak and Uncle Junque d’Avon.

In 1983, Lois started and named the festival “Aunt Teak and Uncle Junque” in combination with the citywide garage sale event.

She is an active member of the Landmark Preservation Commission, the Avon Historical Society and the French Creek Foundation, is the host of Fall into Avon and Christmas Candlelight Walk, and is a member of the Garden Club.

She has also worked as a real estate agent, selling numerous homes in the area and organizing real estate sales.

Longtime Avon residents may remember the “Outhouse Races” on Stoney Ridge Road many years ago. Lois also helped organize this event.

Lois is known as “Lady Avon” and still wears her old Victorian outfits from the 1800s with various stylish hats for shows and events.

She grew up on Willo Road in Avon. She attended Avon schools and served as class president.

The Shinko currently live in a century old house / historic house in Avon. They have two children, David Shinko and Anne Marie Shinko-Brown; and four grandchildren, Ryan and Kyle Shinko, and Nathan and Evan Brown.

The Country Store will be celebrating June 21-27 with special sales and raffle baskets. Stop by the Shinko Country Store and meet Aunt Teak and Uncle Junque and get a free raffle ticket for prizes. June 26-27 is the Teak Aunt and Uncle Junque event in town.

Congratulations to the whole Shinko family.

AVON

The pastor withdraws: Holy Trinity Parish is working with the Catholic Diocese of Cleveland to find a new pastor after Reverend John Misenko recently resigned from the church due to medical circumstances.

According to information released by the church, Misenko asked for time to “get some medical problems under control.” Misenko has been the pastor of the Holy Trinity for 23 years.

Reverend John Manning has been appointed by Bishop Edward Malesic as interim administrator and will assume the necessary duties and tasks during the transition. The Clergy Staff Council is currently undertaking the next steps in the process of recommending the name of a new pastor to the bishop, which includes input from the parish community.

Holy Trinity parishioners are encouraged to participate by completing a survey. Go to surveymonkey.com/r/HolyTrinityAvon.

New Italian restaurant coming soon: You may have noticed some activity at the former Café Piccolo space, 35568 Detroit Road (across from Melt Bar and Grilled), which was to be the Flair 22 restaurant. The space will now house Antica Italian Kitchen and Bar. More details to come.

The chef retires: Congratulations to Avon Police Chief Richard Bosley on his upcoming retirement from the police service this summer. He served almost 10 years as a chef and 22 years in total in the city. Prior to working at Avon, he was police chief at Elyria for five years and also worked at Grafton. Bosley also served in the Marine Corps Reserves. The new police chief will be Daniel Fischbach.

Yoga, story time in the woods: Bring a yoga mat or blanket and celebrate the Midsummer with a kid-friendly yoga story and practice from 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. on June 21 at Every Child’s Playground, 36265 Detroit Road (weather permitting. allows).

Summer Solstice Yoga: Enjoy the start of summer with yoga for all ages from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. on June 21 at Every Child’s Playground, 36265 Detroit Road (weather permitting). Bring a mat and a bottle of water. The event is sponsored by Cultivate Yoga, the Avon Parks and Recreation Department, and the Avon Library.

Candidate from district 1: As noted in a previous Short Takes, all neighborhood seats on City Council are being re-elected and all incumbents are in the running. Ward 1 now has a challenger, as Jennifer Demaline recently applied to the Lorain County Election Board to run for the seat.

Condolences: My deepest condolences and prayers to the Scaletta family on the recent passing of Joe Scaletta. The former wrestling educator and trainer is a member of the Bay Village High School Athletic Hall of Fame. In 2019, he was inducted into the National Wrestling Hall of Fame as an Outstanding Citizen.

He went on to found Scaletta Development Corp., which is the company behind many developments in the city, including Avenbury Lakes. Joe has served on numerous boards, including the Avon Board of Education, the Leadership of Lorain County, the Northcoast Home Builders Association, and the Ohio Home Builders Association.

In 2015, Joe and his wife, Leslie, founded the Ohio Chapter of Reel Recovery and have since raised $ 100,000 for the organization. Reel Recovery is a national non-profit organization that conducts three-day fishing retreats for men with cancer at no cost to participants.

Yell: Despite the recent cold, volunteers from Avon Christian Heritage Church planted flowers at police and fire stations in the town of Avon. Thank you.

LAKE AVON

Greenbox registration program: The city’s Greenbox program is back for the summer and with some new locations. For those new to the program, it offers free boxes with craft items for kids ages 5 to 12 to enjoy outdoors while they craft and create.

Each Greenbox is provided with an attendant at specific times. Greenbox locations include: Bleser Park, 10 am to noon Monday through Thursday; Redwood Elementary, 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays; Westview Elementary, 10 am to noon on Wednesdays and Fridays; Weiss Field, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Monday to Thursday; Sunset Road, 10 am to noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays; Belle Road, 10 am to noon on Tuesdays and Thursdays; Overlook Road, from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Wednesdays and Fridays; Wedgewood Drive, 10 am to noon on Wednesdays and Fridays; Resatar Park, from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays; and Inwood Blvd., from 12:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday.

The program begins June 14.

Avon Lake Police Academy: Get behind the scenes of the Avon Lake Police Department by attending the upcoming Avon Lake Police Academy. The 10 week program begins September 8.

Each session covers distinct areas of ministry operations, including firearms, communications, patrols, and evidence gathering. The academy is open to residents 21 years of age and older. Participants must complete an application form and are subject to a background check.

Applications are available on request by emailing rburson@avonlakepolice.org or can be picked up at the dispatch window in the department lobby, 32855 Walker Road. The deadline for applications is July 26 and admission is on a first come, first served basis.

NORTH RIDGEVILLE

Garage sale : The North Ridgeville Historical Society is holding a garage sale on the lawn of Olde Town Hall, 36119 Center Ridge Road, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on June 12 in conjunction with the town’s garage sale days (9- June 12). The sale will take place rain or shine.

Next summer concert: Enjoy a night of music from The WIXY 1260’s: Ft. Cleveland Clearwater Revival from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on June 13 at the South Central Park Gazebo, 7565 Avon Belden Road.

Shredding day: Gather your papers and other paper to shred from 9 a.m. to noon on June 26 in the North Ridgeville Library parking lot, 35700 Bainbridge Road.

Each household can bring up to five boxes of standard size copier paper or five grocery bags of documents. Papers may have staples or paper clips; however, binders, binders, spiral-bound notebooks, other metal objects, batteries, or electronic devices are not permitted for shredding.

Blood collect: The American Red Cross is hosting a 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. blood drive on June 24 at the North Ridgeville Library, 35700 Bainbridge Road. Appointments are compulsory. To plan, call 1-800-ROUGE CROIX, or go to RedCrossBlood.org.

Yell: Boy Scout Pack and Troop 153 won the award for best float at Memorial Day Parade.

If you have any news / information or an idea for a story that you would like to share or a ‘shout out’, please send an email to jshortavon@aol.com.

Read more of the Sentinel of the Sun.



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Conservatives call Rapides cemetery historically unique | Louisiana News https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/conservatives-call-rapides-cemetery-historically-unique-louisiana-news/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/conservatives-call-rapides-cemetery-historically-unique-louisiana-news/#respond Sun, 06 Jun 2021 04:01:00 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/conservatives-call-rapides-cemetery-historically-unique-louisiana-news/ By MELINDA MARTINEZ, Conference on the city of Alexandria ALEXANDRIA, Louisiana (AP) – Within the grounds of the Old Rapides Cemetery are buried a multitude of personalities who shaped the founding of the Parish of Rapides and the State of Louisiana. “It is the most historic land in all of central Louisiana,” said local historian […]]]>


By MELINDA MARTINEZ, Conference on the city of Alexandria

ALEXANDRIA, Louisiana (AP) – Within the grounds of the Old Rapides Cemetery are buried a multitude of personalities who shaped the founding of the Parish of Rapides and the State of Louisiana.

“It is the most historic land in all of central Louisiana,” said local historian Mike Wynne of the one-and-a-half acres near the Red River.

Enemund Meullion, the last Spanish commander of the district of El Rapido, or as it is called in French, Poste du Rapides, is buried there with his wife and bodyguard. Senators, members of the US Congress and governors are also buried there along with many ordinary citizens.

Many names on gravestones are familiar with streets named after Foisy, Hill, Marye, Overton, Thornton, and Turner. Or towns named after Captain CE Ball or Judge Henry Boyce.

Political cartoons

The cemetery dates back more than 200 years, to the time when the Spaniards ruled the region. It has been registered in the national register since 1979.

According to “Under the Shade of the Trees: History and Stories of the Old Rapids Cemetery” by Father Chad Partain, Bobby Downs Hynson and Andrea Wilson Warren, the cemetery was known as the Old Catholic Cemetery before it was called the Graveyard of the fast.

The registers of the Catholic Church of the parish of Rapides were destroyed in a fire in 1895. The history of the cemetery has been reconstructed thanks to the tombstones which still exist.

There are around 2,300 known graves at the cemetery, but it may only be a small number of people who were buried there. It is also possible that one person after another is buried on top of each other.

The earliest graves or graves had wooden or metal crosses that had been rotting for a long time, Wynne said. The oldest monument belongs to Pierre Baillo, 15, who died in 1809.

“In 1809 it was already a large cemetery,” said Wynne.

It was there that Wynne and two other historians, Mike Tudor and Paul Price, all from the Historic Rapides Cemetery Preservation Society, met to discuss the cemetery and plans to create a cemetery district that would include the four cemeteries located at downtown Pineville. The Rapids Cemetery, Methodist Cemetery, Jewish Cemetery and Mount Olivet Cemetery would be promoted as a historic tourist destination.

“We can actually document what happened here because it’s very closely tied to the history of the colony,” Price said. “It was the burial place of all citizens.”

After the Civil War, Alexandria was burnt down, the community was impoverished and the cemetery was in a sorry state, Price said. Local citizens formed the Rapides Cemetery Association, which was chartered in 1872, and they managed the cemetery until 2000. It was then that the town of Pineville took over the cemetery. The Historic Rapides Cemetery Preservation Society, led by Partain and Hynson, has been in existence since 2012.

The Rapids Cemetery is located near the Gillis-Long Bridge, better known as the Jackson Street Bridge. This site is where the home of the first Spanish commander Etienne Marafet Layssard once stood.

Among those buried in the Rapids cemetery are Alexander Fulton, the founder of Alexandria; Pierre Baillio who built Kent Plantation House; James Madison Wells, Governor of Louisiana during Reconstruction; Cornelia LeGras, a free woman of color who owned land in her name; and Nick Velotta, an Italian immigrant who owned a grocery store.

It is one of the few cemeteries where people regardless of religion, race, nationality or socioeconomic status are buried together, Wynne said.

“It was a public cemetery and public means public,” Price said. Anyone could be buried there.

“This is what makes it very rare,” Wynne said. “Every kind of person is represented in this cemetery and everyone in central Louisiana has been buried here.”

Besides the New Orleans and Baton Rouge cemeteries, this is what sets the Rapids cemetery apart, Tudor said.

“The French and the Spanish did not have the same discrimination against blacks as the Anglo-Saxon slave masters,” Tudor said. “They released more and they allowed them to be buried with them. It was specific to French and Spanish. The Anglo-Saxons and the British were more racist and would not allow it. “

What also makes the cemetery unique are the artistic details of the fences surrounding the plots or adorning the graves.

“Look at the pattern of the leaf and the flower,” Price said, pointing to a marble grave of five-year-old boy William Prescott. “It’s exquisite. And it is the purest white marble you can find anywhere and certainly in our cemetery.

It is because of these unique aspects that the Historic Rapides Cemetery Preservation Society, under the direction of Tudor, is working on the creation of a cemetery district with guided tours.

The Historic Rapides Cemetery Preservation Society will meet with the downtown Pineville Development District on June 14 to see if the area can be turned into a cemetery district.

“It is essential for them to fund these things that we ask for,” Tudor said. They need funds for roads, markers and the removal of tree stumps left by Hurricane Laura.

“The Pineville Downtown Development District is a relatively new creation, which aims to promote downtown, so we hope they will help us focus on that,” Tudor said. He said the city had already committed to re-roading the cemetery. The company is also going to have a marker. They would also like to have funds for things like cleaning up the cemetery and banners promoting the neighborhood.

“Preserving the history of this cemetery is vitally important to central Louisiana – indeed all of Louisiana,” said Wynne. “But it’s also about tourism – bringing tourism dollars into central Louisiana.”

The company is looking for volunteers to be tour guides and volunteers to help with the upkeep of the cemetery.

“We are trying to bring together a group of citizens to help keep the cemetery at its best so that tours from all over the country can come here,” Wynne said.

“We will try to have a whole group of volunteer docents to lead these tours, especially for eighth graders,” Tudor said. “You can teach Louisiana history right here. “

The company also wrote a leaflet on the history of the Rapides cemetery which also includes the stories of 26 people who are buried there.

“We could have done 100-150, but we picked 26 very important but varied people from the community,” said Wynne.

The leaflet will serve as a catalyst to publicize the cemetery tours to visitors who can self-guide or take a guided tour with a volunteer. It highlights aspects of the cemetery for tourists or even eighth grade Louisiana history students. The flyer would be available at the Alexandria / Pineville Area Visitors and Convention Bureau.

An annual fall cemetery tour was organized by the company, with the latest taking place in 2019 due to the 2020 pandemic. The tour featured actors portraying those buried in the cemetery and telling their stories.

“It’s a hidden gem,” Tudor said. “To me, it’s as important, historic and interesting as the American Cemetery or St. Louis No. 1 and I’m not exaggerating.”

The American Cemetery, located in Natchitoches, is said to be the oldest cemetery in Louisiana’s purchasing territory. St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 is located in New Orleans where Voodoo Queen Maria Laveau is buried.

“It’s really a diamond that’s always been there, but we’re really going to make it shine,” said Tudor of the Rapids Cemetery.

Copyright 2021 The Associated press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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Canada confronts its past as it finds graves of Indigenous children https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/canada-confronts-its-past-as-it-finds-graves-of-indigenous-children/ https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/canada-confronts-its-past-as-it-finds-graves-of-indigenous-children/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 19:16:47 +0000 https://catholicrecordsociety.co.uk/canada-confronts-its-past-as-it-finds-graves-of-indigenous-children/ The discovery of an anonymous grave containing the remains of more than 200 Indigenous children, including one possibly as young as 3 years old, rocked Canada. The burial site was found using ground-penetrating radar at the site of a former residential school in British Columbia. Residential schools were government-sponsored religious institutions designed to forcibly assimilate […]]]>


The discovery of an anonymous grave containing the remains of more than 200 Indigenous children, including one possibly as young as 3 years old, rocked Canada. The burial site was found using ground-penetrating radar at the site of a former residential school in British Columbia.

Residential schools were government-sponsored religious institutions designed to forcibly assimilate Indigenous children into white culture. A network of 130 residential schools was established across the country from the 1870s, and the last did not close until the mid-1990s. Schools were plagued by physical, emotional and sexual abuse.

Why we wrote this

The discovery of the remains of more than 200 children in a former British Columbia school could highlight Canada’s abuse of Indigenous peoples in the same way that the murder of George Floyd did for police brutality against the Black Americans.

In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission concluded that Canada had committed “cultural genocide” by removing 150,000 Indigenous children from their homes. So far, 4,100 children have died in schools.

But even if the statistics were known, the current discovery has always been devastating. “We are a country meant to be the leader in human rights, equality and justice for all, and embracing diversity to the point where it is our motto,” said Angela White, Director executive of the Indian Residential School Survivors Society in British Columbia. . “And all of a sudden, that perception was shattered to the core.”

Toronto

The discovery of an anonymous grave containing the remains of more than 200 Indigenous children, including one possibly as young as 3 years old, rocked Canada. The burial site was found using ground-penetrating radar at the site of a former residential school in British Columbia. The Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation announced the preliminary discovery near the grounds of what was once the Kamloops Indian Residential School, which was operated by the Roman Catholic Church and was one of the largest in Canada.

What happened to these children?

Residential schools were government-sponsored religious institutions designed to address what was once called the “Indian problem,” by forcibly equating native children with white culture. In the 19th century, Canada’s first prime minister, John A. Macdonald, was cited in historical documents saying: “Indian children should be removed as much as possible from parental influence, and the only way to do that would be to put them in centrally trained industrial schools, where they will acquire the habits and ways of thinking of men. white. “A network of 130 residential schools was established across the country from the 1870s, and the last did not close until the mid-1990s.

Why we wrote this

The discovery of the remains of more than 200 children in a former British Columbia school could highlight Canada’s abuse of Indigenous peoples in the same way that the murder of George Floyd did for police brutality against the Black Americans.

For more than a century, the children of Canada’s Indigenous peoples – First Nations, Inuit and Métis – have been forcibly removed from their homes. Not only were children banned from speaking their language and forced to convert to Christianity, schools were also plagued with physical, emotional and sexual abuse – and in extreme cases, even death. Survivors have long said that many of their classmates simply vanished, their true fate unknown.

Were these kinds of graves a surprise?

They shouldn’t have been. In 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) concluded that Canada had committed “cultural genocide” by removing 150,000 Indigenous children from their homes, and the fourth volume of the report is titled “Missing Children and Unmarked Burials”. “. So far, 4,100 children have died, but many believe the number is higher.

But even though the statistics were known, the discovery was devastating, sparking vigils and commemorations across the country. For the survivors, it resurfaced tragic memories, many of which were erased, says Angela White, executive director of the Indian Residential School Survivors Society in British Columbia.



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